Sociology (SOC)

SOC 055: Introduction to Sociology (3 Credits)

An introduction to basic sociological concepts, theories, and methods. Students in the course will be encouraged to develop "sociological imagination," that is, an understanding of the connection between personal biography and history. Course content will include an examination of social structure and culture (and the relationship between these two concepts), the socialization process, the major social institutions and their impact, the nature of inequality in society, and deviant behavior and social problems.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior

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SOC 058: Social Problems (3 Credits)

This course acquaints students with theoretical and empirical aspects of some of the major social problems afflicting American society and the world. Topics may include crime and delinquency, poverty, unemployment, drug and alcohol abuse, family violence, prejudice and discrimination, and environmental pollution. Emphasis is placed on the objective and subjective aspects of social problems and their proposed remedies and solutions. Students are exposed to the roles that power and influence play in defining social problems, in maintaining existing conditions, and in promoting social change.

Note(s): Service learning component is optional.

SOC 060: Business & Society (3-4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to an analysis of how businesses and other organizations interact with the communities around them. Students will learn about the social impacts of businesses and how social entrepreneurship bridges social goals and business plans. Nonprofit organizations will also be discussed as organizations working within the larger social context. Students will also learn about organizations and inequality.

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SOC 091: Methods of Social Research with Lab (4 Credits)

An introduction to the techniques social scientists use to answer empirical questions. Topics include how to read published research; collect and analyze qualitative and quantitative data; communicate research results; distinguish between empirical, ideological, theoretical, and ethical questions; formulate research questions; and use computers to access, organize, analyze, and display social science data. Actual research methods covered vary from year to year but generally include social observation, interviewing, and surveys.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 055

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SOC 094: Sociology of Mass Communication (3 Credits)

This course is designed as an introductory sociological study of mass communications. It is intended to provide an understanding of the interaction between individuals, media, and society; analytic insight into how media content is created and disseminated; and knowledge of the organizational structures of various mass media. Advertising, news, politics, gender, class, and race issues are examined.

SOC 101: Sociology of Families (3-4 Credits)

How do families change over time and across cultures? Is divorce bad for children? Do children raised by LGBTQ+ parents have better or worse outcomes than children raised by heterosexual couples? How do racism and economic opportunities shape marriage rates? This course explores controversial issues for families and uses a sociological lens to understand how race, gender, sexuality, and class shape the way families are organized.

Meets the following Core requirements: Race, Gender & Power

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SOC 108: Urban Sociology (3 Credits)

The process of urbanization, with special reference to the evolution of cities in the United States and Canada. Social, economic, and political forces that have shaped cities will be considered. Major concerns of urban residents, and the role of local, state, and federal governments in addressing these concerns will be examined.

SOC 112: Social Control (3 Credits)

A sociological inquiry into how human groups define and react to "deviant" behavior. Topics include how law, violence, threats, hostage taking, banishment, restitution, ridicule, gossip, etiquette, science, and conscience are used to keep individuals and organizations "in line" in realms such as art, business, religion, language, diplomacy, community life, schools, personal relationships, conversation, families, scientific research, the professions, and the workplace.

SOC 116: History of Sociological Thought (3 Credits)

The works of leading sociological theorists, the historical-ideological setting of each theorist, and major trends of development of sociological thought, with particular reference to the 19th and 20th centuries. Intensive reading in the primary sources.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 055 or ANTH 058

SOC 129: Race and Ethnic Relations in the U.S. (3 Credits)

A holistic approach to race and ethnic relations in the U.S., emphasizing macro-sociological issues of race and ethnic group assimilation and discrimination. Examines the creation and maintenance of institutional racism and its relationship to other forms of social inequality, such as gender and class. Special attention is given to the federal system of government and other major societal institutions as they influence processes of elite and subordinate group formation and maintenance in American life.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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SOC 134: Social Inequality (3 Credits)

Theories examining the dimensions, sources, and consequences of social inequality. The multidimensional nature of the U.S. stratification system. Pluralist and elitist views of the power structure. Sociological differences in life chances, lifestyles, and cultural values.

Note(s): Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

SOC 142: Medical Sociology (3 Credits)

Use of the sociological perspective in understanding the nature of disease, health, and medical care. Topics will include culturally based notions of health and illness, social roles of patients and healthcare providers, physician socialization, the distribution of diseases and medical resources, ethical issues in healthcare, and women in the health system.

Note(s): Service learning component is optional. Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

SOC 144: Sociology of Childhood (3-4 Credits)

How are children's lives different across class and race in the United States? Why are some children seen as dangerous and others in need of protection and care? What are the pros and cons of treating teenagers as children? This course explores the ways that education, family structure, the criminal justice system, and the child welfare system affect the lives of children in the U.S. Special attention will be paid to intersections of race, class, gender, immigration, and sexuality.

Meets the following Core requirements: Community Engagement, Race, Gender & Power

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SOC 145: Sociology of Education (3-4 Credits)

This course is organized around issues of diversity, acculturation, and quality in educating children and adults in the United States. Students will examine the dynamic complexities of formal education as it reflects the norms, values, mores, and traditions of the society. Utilizing structural-functionalist, symbolic interaction, and conflict theories, we will explore the processes of social control and social change endemic to the American system of education and its attendant institutions. United States educational policies are critically assessed through cross-national comparisons.

Note(s): Limited to 25 undergraduate and 6 graduate students. Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Community Engagement

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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SOC 146: Sociology of Hip-Hop (3-4 Credits)

This course investigates the social, political, and economic context of hip-hop in the post-civil rights U.S. Urban areas have changed in profound ways during this time with increased policing, drugs and the drug wars, persistent racism, failing schools, increased joblessness, and dramatically changing family structures, all of which have shaped hip-hop. The course examines these sociological issues and their expression in the four foundational elements of hip-hop: rapping, DJ-ing, breaking, and graffiti art, as well as spoken word, hip-hop leadership, and politics.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates only. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only.

Meets the following Core requirements: Community Engagement, Race, Gender & Power

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SOC 149: Sociology of U.S. Immigration (3-4 Credits)

This course examines contemporary immigration to the U.S. within a historical context. Key themes include the relationship between immigration and the economy, education, language, politics, and ethnic identity. The history of U.S. immigration policy is central to our examination of racial and ethnic discrimination and assimilation. In addition, we will compare the immigration experiences of various ethnic groups such as Europeans, Asians, Pacific Islanders, Mexicans, Central Americans, Africans, Middle Easterners, and others.

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SOC 149SL: Sociology of U.S. Immigration (4 Credits)

This course examines contemporary immigration to the U.S. within a historical context. Key themes include the relationship between immigration and the economy, education, language, politics, and ethnic identity. The history of U.S. immigration policy is central to our examination of racial and ethnic discrimination and assimilation. In addition, we will compare the immigration experiences of various ethnic groups such as Europeans, Asians, Pacific Islanders, Mexicans, Central Americans, Africans, Middle Easterners, and others.

Meets the following Core requirements: Community Engagement, Race, Gender & Power

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SOC 155: SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (0.25-1.25 Credits)

SOC 156: Sociology of Oakland (4 Credits)

This course is a sociological examination of the city of Oakland. The focus is on postwar development and the race, gender and class dynamics that have shaped the city. The course focuses on four sociological themes: housing, education, crime, and activism. Students will analyze quantitative and qualitative data to understand the sociological issues facing the city and possibilities for social change. The course will also use community engaged learning practices to connect readings to organizations and people in the city of Oakland.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Community Engagement, Race, Gender & Power

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SOC 158: Gender and Society (3 Credits)

The course investigates gender inequality in the United States with some global comparison. Focus is on social construction of femininity, masculinity, gendered violence, wage gap, intersectionality, family, work, health, media, and social movements.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Women and Gender

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SOC 160: Political Sociology (3 Credits)

Introduction to the dynamics of power in society, from small group interactions to national and international actions and interactions. Emphasis is on American political institutions and participation. Special attention is placed on the economy, race/ethnicity, gender, citizenship, nation building, and federalism on modern political processes.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

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SOC 172: Body Politics: Race, Gender, and Power (3-4 Credits)

Cosmetic surgery, skin bleaching, reproductive justice, and dancing: what do they all have in common? Body politics. The course will focus on topics such as policing and the construction of criminal bodies, the beauty industry and the construction of ugly bodies, healthcare and the construction of sick bodies, reproductive justice and the construction of fertile/irresponsible bodies. The readings will offer an intersectional approach to studying the body by looking at race, gender, class, citizenship, abilities, and sexuality.

Meets the following Core requirements: Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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SOC 179: Directed Research (0.25-1.25 Credits)

SOC 180: Special Topics in Sociology (3 Credits)

Exploration of themes and/or topics not offered as part of the regular curriculum. Course content to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

SOC 180S: Body Politics (3-4 Credits)

Meets the following Core requirements: Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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SOC 190: Proseminar in Sociology (4 Credits)

This course builds upon the skills and knowledge gained in the earlier sociology and anthropology courses and lays the groundwork for conducting original research for the senior thesis. Students will select topics for their research, construct research questions, review and analyze the existing literature, and develop proposals detailing the strategies that they will use in conducting original research.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 091 or ANTH 057

Note(s): Junior standing required.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

SOC 191: Senior Seminar (4 Credits)

Directed original research and senior projects.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 091 and SOC 190

Note(s): Prerequisite: Senior standing; consent of instructor for juniors and non-majors. Limit 25 students. Open to juniors and seniors only.

Meets the following Core requirements: Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Written Communication

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SOC 194: Sociology of Mass Communication (3 Credits)

This course is designed as an introductory sociological study of mass communications. It is intended to provide an understanding of the interaction between individuals, media, and society; analytic insight into how media content is created and disseminated; and knowledge of the organizational structures of various mass media. Advertising, news, politics, gender, class, and race issues are examined.

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SOC 245: Sociology of Education (4 Credits)

This course is organized around issues of diversity, acculturation, and quality in educating children and adults in the United States. Students will examine the dynamic complexities of formal education as it reflects the norms, values, mores, and traditions of the society. Utilizing structural-functionalist, symbolic interaction, and conflict theories, we will explore the processes of social control and social change endemic to the American system of education and its attendant institutions. United States educational policies are critically assessed through cross-national comparisons with coun

Note(s): Limited to 25 undergraduate and 6 graduate students. Open to graduate students only.

Instructor Consent Required: Y