Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 040: Life-Span Developmental Psychology (3 Credits)

Normative characteristics and developmental processes of human development from prenatal infant development through old age.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

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PSYC 049: Fundamentals of Psychology (3 Credits)

The subject matter, methods, and current status of psychology, including brain function, child development, perception, learning and thinking, motivation and emotion, personality, abnormality, and social psychology. The focus is on human behavior, with only limited reference to animal research, and includes cross-cultural issues where applicable.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior

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PSYC 070: Psychology and Language (3 Credits)

Basic linguistic definitions, evolution of language(s) and the acquisition of one or more languages, language use in both communication and thought, sociocultural issues including gender differences, and physiological issues including brain localization and traumatic loss of language.

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PSYC 080: Adolescence (3 Credits)

Physical, cognitive, and social-emotional aspects of human development from puberty to maturity.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

Note(s):

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PSYC 109: Health Psychology (3 Credits)

Examination of the links between mind and body, focusing on the ways in which psychosocial factors influence the prevention of, course of, and adaptation to illness. Review of physiological mechanisms, health behaviors, stress and coping, and therapeutic techniques.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

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PSYC 109SL: Health Psychology with Service Learning (4 Credits)

Examination of the links between mind and body, focusing on the ways in which psychosocial factors influence the prevention of, course of, and adaptation to illness. Review of physiological mechanisms, health behaviors, stress and coping, and therapeutic techniques.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

Meets the following Core requirements: Community Engagement

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PSYC 110: Stress and Disease (3-4 Credits)

Impact of stress on psychological and physical health. Stressors pertaining to family, work, social transitions, and traumatic events are explored. The effects of stress on growth and aging, major medical illnesses, depression, and post-traumatic stress are addressed. The role of individual differences in moderating health effects are underlying themes throughout the course.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

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PSYC 118: Psychopathology (3 Credits)

Abnormal behavior, including neuroses, psychoses, and character disorders, in which psychological, genetic, biochemical, and stress-diathesis theories of causation are reviewed and treatment modalities studied.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

Note(s): Not recommended for first-year students.

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PSYC 130: Human Memory (3 Credits)

In this course, we will discuss the cognitive processes involved in encoding, storage, and retrieval of information in terms of current theories of memory and information processing. We will examine the applications and the neural bases of different human memory systems (e.g., episodic, semantic, and procedural memory). We will also look at memory research conducted in applied settings, for example, eyewitness testimony, memory changes in old age, and memory ability in childhood.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

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PSYC 132: Physiological Psychology (3 Credits)

Aspects of human physiology, primarily the evolution, development, and functioning of the central nervous system and endocrines, that determine behavior, e.g., perception, sexuality, and states of consciousness.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

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PSYC 140: Life-Span Developmental Psychology (4 Credits)

Normative characteristics and developmental processes of human development from prenatal infant development through old age.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

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PSYC 142: Attachment and Loss (4 Credits)

John Bowlby's seminal work in attachment, separation, and loss. Explores the influence of separation and loss on normative and atypical development.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049 and PSYC 140

Note(s): Prerequisites: PSYC 049 and a grade of C or better in PSYC 140 and at least one other upper-division course.

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PSYC 145: Positive Psychology: The Science of Well-Being (3 Credits)

This course examines the burgeoning domain of positive psychology. Positive psychology is defined as the scientific study of the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive. Psychology has historically focused on psychological problems and how to treat them. We will study the findings of contemporary psychological research on what factors help people thrive.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

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PSYC 146: Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (4 Credits)

Quantitative methods in psychology with an emphasis on applications and statistical reasoning.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

Note(s): Open to psychology and biopsychology majors who are sophomores or higher only. First-year students and non-majors need permission of instructor to enroll.

Meets the following Core requirements: Quantitative Literacy

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Quantitative and Computational Reasoning

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PSYC 148: Personality (3 Credits)

A comparison of the major theoretical approaches in personality including psychoanalytic, biological, dispositional, cognitive, behavioral, and sociocultural. Contemporary personality issues and research findings are examined.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior

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PSYC 151: Research Methods in Psychology (4 Credits)

Experimental and research methodology in contemporary psychology. Specific topics from many areas of psychology are employed to teach basic concepts and methods of observation, measurement, hypothesis formation, experimental design, data collection, data analysis, and generalization.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049 and PSYC 146

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior

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PSYC 151L: Research Meth in Psych Lab (0 Credits)

PSYC 155: Social Psychology (3 Credits)

How people think about, influence, and relate to one another. Topics include prejudice, conformity, persuasion, altruism, stereotyping, group processes, and close relationships.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior

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PSYC 156: Cognitive Psychology (3 Credits)

Human thinking and problem solving as "information processing," based on the processes of perception, learning, memory, language, and reasoning.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

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PSYC 158: Psychology of Intergroup Relations and Prejudice (3 Credits)

This course examines psychological theory and research on intergroup relations and prejudice. This includes the study of intergroup conflict, prejudice, and cooperation from a variety of psychological perspectives (e.g., social identity theory, personality, and group-conflict models). Other topics covered include self-concept, group identity, cognitive processing, stereotyping, discrimination, and cultural influences on behavior.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 155 or PSYC 148

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PSYC 161: Clinical Psychology (3 Credits)

Theories and interventions, including interviewing and assessment, of clinical psychology. Overview of the diverse roles and settings (such as hospital, private, legal, and academic) that clinical psychologists occupy in their careers.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049 and PSYC 118

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PSYC 165: Infancy (4 Credits)

Theories and research in physical growth, perception, cognition, and socioemotional and language development in infants.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

Note(s): Graduate students enroll in PSYC 265.

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PSYC 168: Memory and Aging (4 Credits)

This course offers a comprehensive overview of how memory changes as a function of normal aging and what cognitive functions are more resistant to age changes. We will explore how factors such as attention changes, neuropsychological changes, aging stereotypes, cultural influences, and emotional regulation affect memory in old age. We will also discuss some of the implications of age-related changes in memory for everyday life and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049 and (PSYC 130 or PSYC 156)

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PSYC 179: Directed Research (1-4 Credits)

PSYC 180: Special Topics in Psychology (3 Credits)

Topics in psychology not offered in the regular curriculum. Taught by regular staff or visitors.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

Note(s): Some topics may be of interest to non-majors.

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PSYC 180A: Behavioral Neuroscience (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the neurobiology of psychological phenomena. It introduces concepts in cellular and circuit-level neural processes that guide how the mind works, including psychological processes such as motivation, emotion, cognition, personality, social behavior, addiction, and psychopathology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

PSYC 180B: Special Topics (0.25-1.25 Credits)

PSYC 180C: Special Topics (0.25-1.25 Credits)

PSYC 180D: Special Topics (0.25-1.25 Credits)

PSYC 180E: Special Topics (0.25-1.25 Credits)

PSYC 180F: SP TP:SOC PSYC CLOSE RELATION (0.25-1.25 Credits)

PSYC 180G: PSYCHOLOGY & DIVERSITY (0.25-1.25 Credits)

PSYC 191: Thesis Project (4 Credits)

Design and execution of an original experiment or other research work in conjunction with a psychology faculty member's research. Each student must plan her own project in consultation with a psychology faculty member and must obtain the faculty member's agreement to supervise her project.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 146 and PSYC 151

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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PSYC 192: History and Issues in Psychology (4 Credits)

Origins and historical development of psychology as a scientific discipline, including some major theorists and how their theories have influenced the discipline of psychology. Discussion of some issues that these theorists have considered and that remain important in psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049

Note(s): Must be a declared major in psychology or have consent of instructors.

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PSYC 193: Infant Mental Health Thesis (4-4 Credits)

This course guides the Psychology major IMH track cohort of students in designing and implementing the research project that will become students' infant mental health master’s thesis project. All students will advance to graduate level in research, including creating a human subjects proposal and thesis proposal, and oral presentation skills.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 146 and PSYC 151 and PSYC 049

Note(s): Students must be Psychology majors on the Infant Mental Health track.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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PSYC 242: Attachment and Loss (4 Credits)

John Bowlby's seminal work in attachment, separation, and loss. Explores the influence of separation and loss on normative and atypical development.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049 and PSYC 140

Note(s): Prerequisites: PSYC 049 and a grade of C or better in PSYC 140 and at least one other upper-division course.

PSYC 265: Infancy (4 Credits)

Theories and research in physical growth, perception, cognition, and socioemotional and language development in infants.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 049 and PSYC 140

PSYC 277: Advanced Teaching Practica (1-4 Credits)

PSYC 280C: Special Topics (0.25-1.25 Credits)

PSYC 293A: Infant Mental Health Master's Thesis I (4 Credits)

Design and execution of an original experiment or other research work in conjunction with a psychology faculty member's research. Each student must plan her own project in consultation with a psychology faculty member and must obtain the faculty member's agreement to supervise her project.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 146 and PSYC 151

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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PSYC 293B: Infant Mental Health Master's Thesis II (4 Credits)

The completion of an original experiment or research study under the supervision of a psychology faculty member. Each student must obtain the faculty member's agreement to supervise her/his project completion.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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PSYC 296: Independent Study (1 Credits)

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