Letters (LET)

LET 070: THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE (0.25-1.25 Credits)

LET 080: Special Topics (0.25-1.25 Credits)

LET 101: Library Resources and Methods (2 Credits)

An introduction to information literacy and cross-disciplinary research practices. This course emphasizes critical engagement with information sources and technologies, including considerations of power, access, and justice. Over the course of the term, students will develop and apply information literacy skills that anchor and advance liberal arts education and lifelong learning.

LET 110: Introduction to Literary Criticism (3 Credits)

An introduction to the most important contemporary schools of literary criticism: New Criticism; Structuralism and Post-structuralism; Marxism, New Historicism, and Post-colonialism; and Psychoanalytic, Feminist, and Gender Criticism. Primary aim is to provide an understanding of the concepts and methodologies characteristic of each school, and to enable students to apply those theoretical approaches to their own reading and critical practice.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 001

LET 111: Women, Gender and Cultural Production in the Global South (3-4 Credits)

This course examines the intersections between race, class, gender, sexuality, power and resistance in the framing of cultural production from the global south. We will study the intellectual roots of woman-centered cultural systems and the relationship between culture, identity, and social change. Major topics include social justice theatre, the women of Negritude, South Asian women film directors and diaspora cinema, the role of documentaries in social critique, testimonial literature as subaltern history, border poetics, and feminist eco-criticism.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

View Course Goals

LET 112: ANCT MYTH:GREEK, ROMAN (0.25-1.25 Credits)

LET 114: Framing Violence in Popular Tales (3-4 Credits)

Short stories have been an important literary and cultural tradition in France since 1690. These stories are far from being mere fairy tales; they unveil the violence of the Early Modern period while revealing the horrors of social and domestic violence. This course has two goals: the first one is to present the nature, extent and causes of domestic, social, and every day violence in absolute and “despotic” regimes of the early modern times. The second one is to “read” violence and the emotions linked to it in popular tale narratives. Course can be taken for French credits.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Language Other than English

View Course Goals

LET 115: African and Caribbean Literatures (3-4 Credits)

A study of oral traditions, prison writing, testimonial literature, de-colonial resistance, colonial education and de-colonial pedagogy, woman-centered traditions and rituals, women and war, as expressed in selected African and Caribbean texts.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

View Course Goals

LET 128: Reading Otherness in the French Enlightenment (3-4 Credits)

This course will focus on the perception and construction of gendered, racialized, and sexualized Otherness in the political and philosophical discourses of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In addition to reading canonical Enlightenment philosophers, we will also examine how the movement manifests itself in less philosophical forms . Perspectives include political philosophy, cultural anthropology, race theory, feminism, and the philosophy of education. Course taught in English, French originals, and additional discussions in French will be available for French speaking students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives

View Course Goals

LET 129: Introduction to the History of Emotions in Early Modern Europe. (3-4 Credits)

This course has two main goals: First it will present emotions as cultural and social practices that change over time. Students will start by studying emotions in their European historical context. Then they will learn how the history of emotions has framed the colonial gaze and Europe's "emotional" categorizations of Otherness. Students will be presented with texts describing the emotional experiences of Westerns when faced with the “Other”. Fear, angry polemic, eager curiosity, a whole emotional rhetoric depicting the “Other” shaped writings on these encounters.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives

View Course Goals

LET 131: Cultures and Identities in the Americas and the Caribbean (3-4 Credits)

Intellectual, social, and political factors will be considered in this critical examination of selected periods and aspects in the cultural formation of Hispanic peoples, from pre-Columbian America and early Spain to present-day cultural developments in Latin America and Hispanic communities in the United States. Theoretical grounding for the analysis of cultural production will also be provided.

Note(s): Check course schedule for availability. Consent of instructor needed for first-year students.

Meets the following Core requirements: International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

View Course Goals

LET 142: French and Francophone Women Writers (3-4 Credits)

A study of major French and Francophone fictional and theoretical texts.. Focuses on the issues involved in the psychosexual and historical construction of gender and gender roles as reflected in the theory and practice of l'écriture féminine and literature.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

View Course Goals

LET 149: Post-Colonial Conditions: Contemporary Women's Writings from Africa (3-4 Credits)

Exploration of contemporary social issues in Africa through the work of contemporary women writers from Francophone and Anglophone traditions, including Ken Bugul (Senegal), Flora Nwapa (Nigeria), Ama Ata Aidoo (Ghana), Nawal El Saadawi (Egypt), Bessie Head (Botswana), Farida Karodia (South Africa), and Calixthe Beyala (Cameroon/France). Issues include women's education, women and nation building, female sexuality, spirituality, exile and expatriate writing, indigenous African feminisms, and changing gender roles. Students will also be introduced to post-colonial theory.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

View Course Goals

LET 150: Gender, Diaspora and Social Issues in Indian Women's Literature and Cinema (3-4 Credits)

A literary, theoretical, and cinematic exploration of how South Asian diasporic communities in Britain, East and South Africa, and the Anglophone Caribbean reconfigure themselves around "migrating" notions of race, class, gender, and nationhood. Issues discussed will include the tension between assimilation and cultural resistance, immigration and its impact on shifting gender ideologies, exile and historical rupture, and hybridized forms of cultural and literary production resulting from the inevitable "clash of cultures."

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

View Course Goals

LET 155: Reading War in Post-Colonial Literature from Africa and the Middle East (3 Credits)

This course will focus on representations of war in post-colonial novels from Nigeria, Algeria, Rwanda, Somalia, Lebanon, and Iraq. We will explore the historical contexts of war in literature, creative resistance to military and political oppression, the link between trauma and memory, women's efforts to "wage peace," and war and sexuality in novels by Assia Djebar, Nuruddin Farah, Buchi Emecheta, Hanan Al-Shaykh, Nuha Al-Radi, and Boris Diop, among others.

LET 157: THE 18TH CENTURY NOVEL (0.25-1.25 Credits)

LET 160: THE 19TH C FRENCH NOVEL (0.25-1.25 Credits)

LET 161: Latin American Women Writers in Translation (3 Credits)

A study of major autobiographical and fictional texts written by Latin American women in the 19th and 20th centuries. Focuses on issues of identities, transatlantic networks and transnational feminism. Critical readings will include recent theoretical approaches to literature by women in Latin America.

Meets the following Core requirements: International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

View Course Goals

LET 162: U.S. Latino Literature and Culture (3 Credits)

A study of U.S. Latino literature and culture with special emphasis on the 20th century. Works by Chicano, Puerto Rican, Mexican, Cuban, Dominican, and other authors writing in the U.S. will be analyzed. By examining works of fiction, poetry, theater, and popular culture, attention will be given to gender, class, and ethnicity in the representations of the experience of U.S. Latinos. The course will introduce critical concepts for the study of Latino/a literature and culture.

Note(s): Offered fall or spring. Check course schedule for availability.

Meets the following Core requirements: Race, Gender & Power

View Course Goals

LET 166: National Literatures of Latin America (3 Credits)

The literary expression of a particular region through a variety of authors, genres, and periods, concentrating on literary accounts of historical events, sociopolitical developments, and the phenomena of mass media and transculturation since the 1930's. Areas of study include the Caribbean (Cuba and Puerto Rico), Mexico, and the Cono Sur (Uruguay, Argentina, and Chile).

Note(s): Offered fall or spring. Check course schedule for availability.

Meets the following Core requirements: International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

View Course Goals

LET 168: Women in Cinema: Latin America, Spain and U.S. Latinas (3 Credits)

Analysis and discussion of films about women and gender issues in the cinema of Latin America, Spain and U.S. Latinas. Topics include gender roles, the woman as "Other," the construction of the female subject, women in/and relations of power, traditional and canonical representations of women's social practices, and the role of cinema in women's practices of resistance and critical opposition.

Note(s): Offered fall or spring. Check course schedule for availability.

Meets the following Core requirements: International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

View Course Goals

LET 169: Hispanic Cinema (3 Credits)

Structural and historical analysis of major exponents in contemporary Hispanic film, including the cinema of Latin America, Spain, and U.S. Spanish-speaking communities. Drawing from both formal and sociocultural models of description, the course examines the film production of well-known directors. A grounding in film theory is concurrently provided and developed throughout the semester. Films in original language with English subtitles.

Meets the following Core requirements: International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

View Course Goals

LET 170: Business French and Cultural Praxis (0.25-1.25 Credits)

This course examines the key features of business practice, business etiquette, the business environment and business people in France. The French business culture is presented in the context of political, economical, sociological, historical and legal influences, and it is compared to two North African countries: Morocco and Algeria as well as to the business culture praxis in the USA. This course is especially designed for business students, international studies students and students who want to get an experience of working in a French speaking environment.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Language Other than English

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

View Course Goals

LET 171: Fantastical Writings: 20th-Century Latin American and U.S. Latino(a) Fiction (3 Credits)

The focus emphasizes short narrative texts which designate "uncanny," "abnormal," and/or "extraordinary" experiences as a challenge to some of the fundamental assumptions underpinning realist fiction, and as a way to engage in critical consideration of philosophical, literary, and other humanistic questions. Topics include the nature of reality, being and existence, time and space, death, humor, the power of words and imagination, and the limits of human knowledge.

Meets the following Core requirements: International Perspectives

View Course Goals

LET 180: Special Topics in Literature (3 Credits)

Exploration of themes and/or topics not offered as part of the regular curriculum. Course content to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

LET 183: Advanced Seminar in Literature (3 Credits)

In-depth examination of and critical inquiry into a specific subject through shared readings, discussion, and written assignments. Course content to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

LET 191: Senior Thesis (4 Credits)

An independent research project that focuses on a topic selected in consultation with the major advisor.

Meets the following Core requirements: International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power, Written and Oral Communication II

View Course Goals

LET 211: Women, Gender and Cultural Production in the Global South (3-4 Credits)

This course examines the intersections between race, class, gender, sexuality, power and resistance in the framing of cultural production from the global south. We will study the intellectual roots of woman-centered cultural systems and the relationship between culture, identity, and social change. Major topics include social justice theatre, the women of Negritude, South Asian women film directors and diaspora cinema, the role of documentaries in social critique,, testimonial literature as subaltern history, border poetics, and feminist eco-criticism.

LET 212: ANCT MYTH:GREEK, ROMAN (0.25-1.25 Credits)

LET 215: African and Caribbean Literatures (3-4 Credits)

A study of oral traditions, prison writing, testimonial literature, de-colonial resistance, colonial education and de-colonial pedagogy, woman-centered traditions and rituals, women and war, as expressed in selected African and Caribbean texts.

LET 225: THE ROMANTIC REVOLUTION (0.25-1.25 Credits)

LET 231: Cultures and Identities in the Americas and the Caribbean (4 Credits)

Intellectual, social, and political factors will be considered in this critical examination of selected periods and aspects in the cultural formation of Hispanic peoples, from pre-Columbian America and early Spain to present-day cultural developments in Latin America, the Caribbean and Hispanic communities in the United States. Theoretical grounding for the analysis of cultural production will also be provided.

Note(s): Check course schedule for availability. Consent of instructor needed for first-year students.

View Course Goals

LET 242: French and Francophone Women Writers (3-4 Credits)

A study of major French and Francophone fictional and theoretical texts written by women in the 19th and 20th centuries. Focuses on the issues involved in the psychosexual and historical construction of gender and gender roles as reflected in the theory and practice of l'écriture féminine.

LET 249: Post-Colonial Conditions: Contemporary Women's Writings from Africa (3-4 Credits)

Exploration of contemporary social issues in Africa through the work of contemporary women writers from Francophone and Anglophone traditions, including Ken Bugul (Senegal), Flora Nwapa (Nigeria), Ama Ata Aidoo (Ghana), Nawal El Saadawi (Egypt), Bessie Head (Botswana), Farida Karodia (South Africa), and Calixthe Beyala (Cameroon/France). Issues include women's education, women and nation building, female sexuality, spirituality, exile and expatriate writing, indigenous African feminisms, and changing gender roles. Students will also be introduced to post-colonial theory.

LET 255: Reading War in Post-Colonial Literature from Africa and the Middle East (4 Credits)

This course will focus on representations of war in post-colonial novels from Nigeria, Algeria, Rwanda, Somalia, Lebanon, and Iraq. We will explore the historical contexts of war in literature, creative resistance to military and political oppression, the link between trauma and memory, women's efforts to "wage peace," and war and sexuality in novels by Assia Djebar, Nuruddin Farah, Buchi Emecheta, Hanan Al-Shaykh, Nuha Al-Radi, and Boris Diop, among others.

LET 261: Latin American Women Writers in Translation (4 Credits)

A study of major autobiographical and fictional texts written by Latin American women in the 19th and 20th centuries. Focuses on issues of identities, transatlantic networks and transnational feminism. Critical readings will include recent theoretical approaches to literature by women in Latin America.

View Course Goals

LET 262: U.S. Latino Literature and Culture (4 Credits)

A study of U.S. Latino literature and culture with special emphasis on the 20th century. Works by Chicano, Puerto Rican, Mexican, Cuban, Dominican, and other authors writing in the U.S. will be analyzed. By examining works of fiction, poetry, theater, and popular culture, attention will be given to gender, class, and ethnicity in the representations of the experience of U.S. Latinos. The course will introduce critical concepts for the study of Latino/a literature and culture.

Note(s): Offered fall or spring. Check course schedule for availability.

LET 266: National Literatures of Latin America (4 Credits)

The literary expression of a particular region through a variety of authors, genres, and periods, concentrating on literary accounts of historical events, sociopolitical developments, and the phenomena of mass media and transculturation since the 1930's. Areas of study include the Caribbean (Cuba and Puerto Rico), Mexico, and the Cono Sur (Uruguay, Argentina, and Chile).

Note(s): Offered fall or spring. Check course schedule for availability.

View Course Goals

LET 268: Women in Cinema: Latin America, Spain and U.S. Latinas (4 Credits)

Analysis and discussion of films about women and gender issues in the cinema of Latin America, Spain and U.S. Latinas. Topics include gender roles, the woman as "Other," the construction of the female subject, women in/and relations of power, traditional and canonical representations of women's social practices, and the role of cinema in women's practices of resistance and critical opposition.

Note(s): Offered fall or spring. Check course schedule for availability.

LET 269: Hispanic Cinema (4 Credits)

Structural and historical analysis of major exponents in contemporary Hispanic film, including the cinema of Latin America, Spain, and U.S. Spanish-speaking communities. Drawing from both formal and sociocultural models of description, the course examines the film production of well-known directors. A grounding in film theory is concurrently provided and developed throughout the semester. Films in original language with English subtitles.

View Course Goals

LET 271: Fantastical Writings: 20th-Century Latin American and U.S. Latino(a) Fiction (4 Credits)

The focus emphasizes short narrative texts which designate "uncanny," "abnormal," and/or "extraordinary" experiences as a challenge to some of the fundamental assumptions underpinning realist fiction, and as a way to engage in critical consideration of philosophical, literary, and other humanistic questions. Topics include the nature of reality, being and existence, time and space, death, humor, the power of words and imagination, and the limits of human knowledge.

View Course Goals

LET 299: Thesis in Progress (0 Credits)