Ethnic Studies (ETHS)

ETHS 011: Leadership for Social Change (2 Credits)

This class will explore theoretical perspectives on student organizing, leadership and social change. We will examine historical and contemporary social movements and connect this knowledge to hands-on experiences by organizing an event or series of events on campus. Students will explore and apply principles of participatory and sustainable leadership, anti-racism, coalition-building and allyship. They will also develop tools to navigate power dynamics in relation to race, class, gender and sexuality.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates only. Open to juniors and seniors only.

Meets the following Core requirements: Community Engagement

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 039: Latin American Social Movements (3-4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the history of Latin American social movements, focusing on the ways that subaltern peoples of indigenous and African ancestry have engaged in decolonial struggles through collective action and contentious politics.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 040: Activism in the Digital Age (3-4 Credits)

A survey of American literary journalism from the 20th century to the present. Close readings and discussion, with sustained focus on craft (e.g. reporting techniques, voice, structure, scene-building and reconstruction, narrative flow). We will also explore the social/historical context of the texts and discuss ethical issues that arise when writing about identifiable people. Primary texts will vary, but may include writers Martha Gelhorn, Lillian Ross, John McPhee, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, Audre Lorde, Alice Walker, Susan Orlean, Sonia Nazario, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Community Engagement, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 041: Inventing the "Other," Policing Differences (3-4 Credits)

This course will cross disciplines, using tools from such fields as literary criticism, post-colonial theory, disability studies, philosophy, and film studies. By closely reading literature, film, and popular culture, we will produce written and visual work and begin to form a better understanding of the ways these genres invent, invoke, illustrate, and control a racial “Other.” From examples drawn from the US and around the world, we will examine a variety of materials from a perspective that considers the intersections of race, class, gender, nation, sexuality, and ability.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, Race, Gender & Power, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Written Communication

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ETHS 042: Ethnicity and Environment in California (3 Credits)

This course emphasizes geographical human-environment interactions in studying the Golden State. Special consideration is given to relationships among natural resource use, economic development, ethnic/race relations, and environmental issues. Topics include physical environments and indigenous societies; the Spanish and Mexican periods; the U.S. takeover; gold and agribusiness; water politics; immigration, racism, and exclusion; urbanization and the environment; and popular social movements.

Note(s): ETHS 142 open only to environmental science and environmental studies majors. Limit 30 students.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 043: Survey of African American Literature (3 Credits)

The goal of this lower-division course is to familiarize students with the major authors, literary movements, artistic strategies, and social concerns that have shaped and defined African American literature during its first 300 years. Topics will include the antebellum period, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and the postmodern era. Writers may include Wheatley, Douglass, Dunbar, Brooks, Walker, Clifton, Bradley, and others.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 001

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 047: The "Third World": Colonialism and Globalization (3 Credits)

An introductory critical and comparative survey of historical, economic, political, social, and environmental forces shaping (and being shaped by) diverse peoples of color, both in the "third world" and the U.S. The course will review key theories and discuss how they influence policies affecting millions of people and their environments. Topics include underdevelopment, colonialism, population, resources, trade, immigration, nationalism, human rights, social movements, and sustainable development.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior, Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 050: Rights, Rebellion, and Resistance: Survey of African American Literature (3 Credits)

The goal of this lower-division course is to familiarize students with the major authors, literary movements, artistic strategies, and social concerns that have shaped and defined African American literature during its first 300 years. Topics will include the antebellum period, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and the postmodern era. Writers may include Wheatley, Douglass, Dunbar, Brooks, Walker, Clifton, Bradley, and others.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 001

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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ETHS 051: Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3 Credits)

An introduction to the history, concepts, and issues concerning ethnic studies. The course compares the experiences of African Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and Chicanas(os)/Latinas(os) within a global context. Historical, social, economic, cultural, and environmental resources are employed in analyzing the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Class activities include lectures, discussion, films, and guest speakers.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 052: African American Women's History (3 Credits)

This course examines the economic, political, social, cultural, religious, and sexual dynamics of African American women's history. We focus on women's lives in West Africa and slavery, Jim Crow segregation, the great migration, Harlem Renaissance, the civil rights era, black nationalism, black women in electoral politics, and black feminism. Three themes are explored: the nature of diaspora and the extent of West African sociocultural retentions; the intersections of race, class, and gender; and African American women's resistance, spirituality, and collective struggles for social change.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates only. Open to juniors and seniors only.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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ETHS 054: American Indian History to 1900 (3 Credits)

An introduction to indigenous populations whose history covers thousands of years prior to the European invasion. The focus will be on sovereignty and the transformation of native traditions including gender relations, tribal languages, educational institutions, religious practices, sociopolitical structures, environmental assaults, and treaty negotiations. We will study the methods native people employed to fight the changes and how those strategies became the foundation for later resistance movements including the Seminole Wars and the Ghost Dance.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 055: Law, Resistance and Identity: American Indian History from 1900 (3 Credits)

This course covers contemporary American Indian history, from 1900 to the present, focusing on relations between the U.S. and American Indians as individuals and tribes. It examines legal decisions and federal policies directed at American Indian issues and tribal responses to these policies. The evolving political status of tribes as sovereign entities forms the core of the course's concerns. Sample topics include citizenship, religious freedom, education, courts and jurisdiction, child welfare, taxation, and economic development.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 064: Mixed Race Descent in the Americas (3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the historical evolution of racially mixed peoples to understand the present concerns of racial and ethnic typecasting. Topics of interest will include rates of outmarriages among and between different groups, census data, legal definitions, mixed-race children, literature, and film portrayals.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 070: African American Music: The Meaning and the Message (3 Credits)

This course is an exploration through discussion into the ideology of "African American" music, encouraging participants to reflect on how and why this music came to be so labeled. We will concentrate on pivotal periods in the evolution of this concept, highlighting the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Nationalism movement and their influence on America and world cultures.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 090: Comparative Ethnic Literature and Cultural Production (3-4 Credits)

An introduction to the literature of people of color in the U.S. In addition to literature, this course considers other forms of cultural production, such as film and visual arts. From an ethnic studies perspective that attends to transnational and diasporic connections, we will read and interpret literary texts and other forms of cultural production in order to interrogate the mechanics of culture and ideology.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Multicultural Perspectives, Written Communication

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ETHS 112: Race, Gender, and the Environment (3 Credits)

This intensive reading and discussion seminar explores how factors such as race, gender, class, colonialism, and concepts of human-environment relations help shape the often contradictory definitions of "environmentalism." We will explore the ideas and assumptions behind issues and movements such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, deep ecology, biotechnology, the population debate, and sustainable development. Readings include both international and U.S. perspectives, and represent competing viewpoints.

Note(s): Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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ETHS 113: Comics and Politics: Visual Culture, Power, and Ideology (3-4 Credits)

Graphic narratives and the interactions of text and image in sequential art are the focus of this course. We will pursue questions regarding power and ideology in the construction of race, gender, and sexuality as produced in visual texts. We will investigate the role of signification and language as well as the choices made in framing and panels to better understand the production of meaning in this genre. With particular attention to work created by artists of color, we will gain insight concerning the fundamentals of visual narratives and storytelling.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 114: Representing Blackness: Film and Literature in Africa and the Diaspora (4 Credits)

This course will examine the changing representations of Africa and the diaspora in film and literature. The class will explore the historical context and ideological motivations behind stereotypical and oppositional portrayals of people of African descent. We will undertake a critical socio-historical review of diverse genres including U.S. "race movies," "blaxploitation," "hood movies," independent African cinema, and contemporary interventions by black feminist and gay filmmakers. Locations include the U.S., the African continent, Europe, and the Caribbean.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 119: Action Research for Social Change (4 Credits)

This course teaches the basic concepts and principles of action research, with an emphasis on participatory action research (PAR), and prepares students to apply its philosophy, values, approaches, and methods to an empowering collaboration between "community members" and "researchers."

Prerequisite(s): ETHS 051 or ETHS 091

Note(s): Open to undergraduates only. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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ETHS 120: Decolonizing Spirituality: Indigenous Religions in the Americas (4 Credits)

This seminar course use decolonizing methodologies to examine Indigenous creation stories, origin narratives, and spirituality in comparison with primary source documents from early explorers. How were Indigenous spiritual practices altered by invading forces? What were the resulting responses? Various viewpoints will be covered in this course including Indigenous peoples from different geographic areas, Native and non-Native perspectives, and spiritual leaders from various Indigenous nations. We shall also examine practices and laws that impeded religious ceremonies/traditions.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates only. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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ETHS 126: Theories of Race and Ethnicity (4 Credits)

This course will expose students to the cutting edge of critical thinking around issues of race and ethnicity. It will provide students with the analysis they need to unpack "common sense" ideas about race and inequality. By using theory as a tool and an opportunity for critical thinking, we will develop a new vocabulary and framework for understanding the history and contemporary impact of race within the U.S. and in a global context.

Prerequisite(s): ETHS 051

Note(s): Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 139: Asian/Pacific American Women Writers (3 Credits)

Reading works by Asian/Pacific American women, we focus on how these writers represent distinctly Asian/Pacific American experiences. We explore past and present social and political issues of particular relevance to APA women, and consider how these issues appear in the texts. Additional topics include the impact of feminist thought, debates regarding feminism versus cultural nationalism, and resistance and compliance to Orientalist depictions of APA women.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 001

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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ETHS 140: Activism in Digital Media Age (3-4 Credits)

This course explores the ways young people use digital and social media to mobilize civic, political, and social movement participation, with a focus on young people of color and immigrant youth. Students explore the possibilities of mediated activism in transforming social inequalities, fostering social connectivity, and deepening democratic citizenship.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 142: Ethnicity and Environment in California (3 Credits)

This course emphasizes geographical human-environment interactions in studying the Golden State. Special consideration is given to relationships among natural resource use, economic development, ethnic/race relations, and environmental issues. Topics include physical environments and indigenous societies; the Spanish and Mexican periods; the U.S. takeover; gold and agribusiness; water politics; immigration, racism, and exclusion; urbanization and the environment; and popular social movements.

Note(s): ETHS 142 open only to environmental science and environmental studies majors. Limit 30 students.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 144: Representation and Politics in Asian Diasporic and Pacific Islander Literature (3-4 Credits)

A survey of Asian/Pacific American and Asian Diasporic literature, including fiction and criticism. We examine major concepts that are vital to the evaluation of Asian/Pacific American and Asian Diasporic literature, such as Orientalism, ethnic differences, and issues of immigration. By pursuing questions regarding authenticity, audience, and the "native informant," as well as the significance of race, class, gender, sexuality, and nation, we will investigate literary and everyday constructions of Asian/Pacific America and the Asian Diaspora.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Multicultural Perspectives, Written Communication

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ETHS 150: Black Feminist Theory (3 Credits)

This course has two complementary goals: first, to analyze the continuities between black women's thought in Africa and in the African Diaspora; and second, to explore how the different locations of West African, African American, and other African Diasporic women affect their perspectives on these common theoretical concerns. The course is interdisciplinary, utilizing historical, literary, sociological, and autobiographical sources to illustrate diverse black feminist and womanist voices.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates only.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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ETHS 154: Writing the Self: Autobiographies of People of Color in the U.S. (3-4 Credits)

This course examines the genre of autobiography genre, and focuses on contemporary writers of color in the U.S., including African American, Asian American, Chicano/Latino, and Native American writers. The course investigates the aims of autobiography, with special attention to the ways in which representation can construct a counterhegemonic self-identity. We will read critical essays as well as a variety of forms of autobiographical writing and produce analytical essays as well as autobiographical work.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 156: Contemporary Queer Writers of Color (3-4 Credits)

This course focuses on works written by contemporary queer writers of color. We will consider the ways in which self-identified gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender authors define such terms of identity, and determine how these definitions are relevant in their writing. Reading fiction, theory, and literary criticism, we will place these texts in a theoretical framework that attends to the intersections between race, gender, class, and sexuality.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 157: Race, Gender, and the Criminal Justice System (3-4 Credits)

With two million incarcerated, immense racial discrepancies, and one in three black young men on probation, parole, or in prison, the U.S. criminal justice system has become a site of contestation. This course will provide students with the tools and historical background they need to engage in meaningful and informed debates about race, gender, crime, and punishment. Themes for discussion include the war on drugs, juvenile justice, the "prison-industrial complex," and the death penalty.

Note(s): Community engaged learning optional for 1.25 credit. Limit 25 students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Community Engagement, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 158: Latin American Transnational Migration (3-4 Credits)

This course examines why people migrate, and how modern international migration differs from previous eras; why Latinas/os have comprised the majority of U.S. immigrants since 1970; how the U.S. government and society have responded, including effects on U.S.-born Latinas/os; and how this growing population is changing both Latin America and the United States. Class meetings include lectures, discussions of diverse readings, and presentations of student research.

Note(s): Service learning optional for 1.25 credit Limit 20 students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Community Engagement, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 159: Intro to Chicanx & Latinx Studies (3-4 Credits)

This course presents a timely introduction to the social, cultural, economic and political experiences of the largest racial-ethnic minority in the United States. Following a comparative ethnic approach, the course focuses on three key aspects: shared histories of colonialism and imperialism, and cross-border connections, social, material and political condition of the Latina/o community in the U.S

Note(s): Service learning optional for 4 credits Limit 20 students.

Meets the following Core requirements: International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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ETHS 160: Militarism, Gender, and Ethnicity (3 Credits)

This course explores race and gender dynamics of militarism, conflict, and peace building with a view to developing local, global, and transnational ethnic studies and feminist perspectives on contemporary militarism. It analyzes the effects of militarism, military rule, and conflict on relations of ethnicity, and examines how women's mobilizations have redefined conflict, peace, and security. The course also examines the environmental and economic impacts of militarism in a historical context.

Note(s): This is a graduate-style seminar class, not open to first years (freshwomen). Limit 20 students. Open to undergraduates only. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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ETHS 165: Politics of Chicanx and Latinx Communities (3-4 Credits)

This course examines how Latinos have used community organizing and social movement participation alongside institutional politics to claim various rights of citizenship, shape contemporary political identities, and fight for full inclusion and representation in the United States.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Community Engagement, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 166: Women of Color in Social Movements (3-4 Credits)

This course examines the economic, political, social, cultural, religious, and sexual dynamics of African American women's history. We focus on women's lives in West Africa and slavery, Jim Crow segregation, the great migration, Harlem Renaissance, the civil rights era, black nationalism, black women in electoral politics, and black feminism. Three themes are explored: the nature of diaspora and the extent of West African sociocultural retentions; the intersections of race, class, and gender; and African American women's resistance, spirituality, and collective struggles for social change.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Community Engagement, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior, Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

View Course Goals

ETHS 170: African American Music: The Meaning and the Message (3 Credits)

This course is an exploration through discussion into the ideology of "African American" music, encouraging participants to reflect on how and why this music came to be so labeled. We will concentrate on pivotal periods in the evolution of this concept, highlighting the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Nationalism movement and their influence on America and world cultures.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Multicultural Perspectives

View Course Goals

ETHS 172: American Indian and Pacific Islander Women (3 Credits)

This course will examine the contributions of American Indian women to their communities. While it is important to understand the present context in which these women struggle for their communities, it is also necessary to examine their changing roles within a historical situation. The focus will include political situations, literature, film, migrations from aboriginal land bases, and public policy.

Note(s): Optional service learning component for 1 additional credit. Limit 20 students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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ETHS 172SL: American Indian and Pacific Islander Women (4 Credits)

This course will examine the contributions of American Indian women to their communities. While it is important to understand the present context in which these women struggle for their communities, it is also necessary to examine their changing roles within a historical situation. The focus will include political situations, literature, film, migrations from aboriginal land bases, and public policy.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Community Engagement, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives, Women and Gender

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ETHS 173: Celluloid Native: American Indians in Film (4 Credits)

This course focuses on images of American Indians in film. The course will study the political context and historical background for the development of cinematic images. Issues include non-Indians who portray Native people; misinformation about tribal cultures and practices; and the abuse of Native images for profit. We will closely examine the ways in which media, particularly film, impacts issues such as self-esteem, interpretation of Native cultures, and continuation of Native traditions.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 180: Special Topics in Ethnic Studies (3-4 Credits)

This course deals with social, political, economic, cultural, and environmental issues of interest to American Indians, African Americans, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, Latinos and Arab Americans. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 180B: Special Topics (0.25-1.25 Credits)

ETHS 180J: Achieving Health Equity (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to public health principles inherent in framing refugee health and tobacco control to engender health equity. Students will understand critical themes of journal articles presenting policy and scientific context to health equity and explore factors that lead to health inequity.

Meets the following Core requirements: Race, Gender & Power

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ETHS 183: Advanced Seminar in Ethnic Studies (4 Credits)

In-depth examination of and critical inquiry into a specific subject through shared readings, discussion, and written assignments. Course content to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates only. Open to juniors and seniors only.

ETHS 188: Film, Color, and Culture: Images of People of Color in Cinema (4 Credits)

This course examines cinematic stereotypes within the framework of a variety of disciplines, including history, sociology, literature, political science, psychology, feminist theory, and ethnic and race relations. The depiction of women and people of color in film is often a one-dimensional portrayal, yet remains the most vivid for many in the dominant society. To provide a foundation for analysis, filmmaking both from an artistic and economic perspective will be presented.

Note(s): Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 189: Research Methods with Communities of Color, with Fieldwork (4 Credits)

This course will equip students with the skills for social research on issues of race and ethnicity. It will enable students to engage with ethical considerations and interrogate the impact of research on communities of color. We will examine anti-oppressive methodologies and explore the possibility of developing research agendas that empower the subjects of research, and that break down the barriers between researcher and researched. The course uses a “research justice” framework in which the researcher becomes an agent of social change carrying out research with, rather than on communities.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Written Communication

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ETHS 190: Research Methods with Communities of Color (4 Credits)

This course will equip students with the skills for social research on issues of race and ethnicity. It will enable students to engage with ethical considerations and interrogate the impact of research on communities of color. We will examine anti-oppressive methodologies and explore the possibility of developing research agendas that empower the subjects of research, and that break down the barriers between researcher and researched. The course uses a “research justice” framework in which the researcher becomes an agent of social change carrying out research with, rather than on communities.

Prerequisite(s): ETHS 051

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives, Written Communication

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ETHS 191: Senior Seminar (4 Credits)

Advanced directed research to write senior thesis.

Prerequisite(s): ETHS 189

Note(s): Open to undergraduates only. Open to juniors and seniors only.

Meets the following Core requirements: Create, Innovate & Experiment

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

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ETHS 280A: Special Topics (0.25-1 Credits)

ETHS 280B: Special Topics (0.25-1 Credits)