Education (EDUC)

EDUC MTG: Education Department Meetings (0 Credits)

EDUC 036: Introduction to Development and Learning in Young Children (3 Credits)

Overview of developmental processes related to planning educational programs for young children, with an emphasis on cognitive development. Implications of physical, cognitive, affective, and social development for learning will be studied, all through a cultural lens. Content will cover typical and atypical development, prenatal through elementary.

Note(s): Required for all child development majors.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior, Multicultural Perspectives

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EDUC 091: ISSUES IN WOMEN'S EDUC (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 099: Teach & Lrng: Intro to Educ (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 100: Introduction to Working in the Child Care Field (2 Credits)

Overview of the child care field examining major theorists, approaches, and delivery systems. Defining appropriate practices and identifying the major challenges to working with young children in group settings.

Note(s): Must be enrolled in the early childhood BA for working professionals

Instructor Consent Required: Y

EDUC 101: Social Foundations of Education (3 Credits)

Overview of the historical, philosophical, and social influences shaping educational practices, beliefs, and goals through history, from the Greeks to the present, focusing on major historical events and selected educational reformers. This course (or an approved equivalent) is required for all credential candidates who earn master's degrees, and is strongly recommended for students in early childhood education. It is also recommended for all Mills students who are interested in schools and their role in society.

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EDUC 102: Teaching for Diversity (3 Credits)

Emphasizes the effects of cultural, racial, gender, and social class influences on what children learn and how they are taught.

EDUC 103: Public Policy: Children, Youth, and Family Issues (3 Credits)

Provides an overview of theory and trends in public policy and federal programs affecting services for children and families. Examination of the networks of agencies, the legislative maze and process at both state and federal levels, advocacy and lobbying, and ways of identifying sources of funding in both the public and private sectors.

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EDUC 105: Trauma Informed Leadership (4 Credits)

This course is designed to help students preparing to be public school administrators develop personal insights, interpersonal skills, and management practices for leading diverse, inclusive programs and organizations with a focus on trauma-informed educational practices and English Language Learner (ELL) programs. This course will introduce students to the core concepts (general theory and foundational knowledge), informing evidence-based assessment and intervention for traumatized children and adolescents. Strength-based practice will be highlighted along with a focus on the identification

Note(s): This course is required for administrative credential students.

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EDUC 110: Communities, Schools, and Critical Social Theory (4 Credits)

This course examines the links between schools and the social structure—the social, economic and political factors that have shaped conditions in urban schools and communities. For instance, the socioeconomic context of urban schools provides an important examination of the role of schooling in a stratified society and provides the theoretical grounding for the course. Critical Social Theories of race/ethnicity, class, gender, and culture will be utilized as frameworks through which to explore the development and current conditions of urban communities, schools, and society.

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EDUC 114: Family Systems and Cultural Diversity: Connections with Schools, Communities, and Hospital Setting (3 Credits)

This course examines the significance of cultural values, traditions, and practices in child-rearing, health, and education for children. Understanding the needs of children in a multicultural society requires knowledge of child development including expertise on a wide range of biomedical factors affecting the child in the hospital, at school, and in various community settings. Equally important is the knowledge of and sensitivity to family culture and the ability to communicate with children and parents from diverse cultures.

Note(s): Meets the state requirements for early childhood special education certification. Meets the child life requirement for Family Systems learning as set forth by the Association of Child Life Professionals.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

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EDUC 116: HEALTH SCIENCE/CHLD & YOUTH (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 120: Urban Education (3-4 Credits)

This course focuses on various perspectives on urban education, conditions for teaching and learning in urban public schools, and current theories of pedagogy in urban classrooms along with a close examination of a few representative and critical issues. While our focus is on schools in the United States, we will broaden our discussion at times to examine the same issues from an international perspective. Central to our study is the organization and impact of key “opportunity structures,” most critically those of race and class, in urban schools and communities.

Meets the following Core requirements: Community Engagement

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Multicultural Perspectives

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EDUC 125: Inquiry and Action in Urban Contexts (3-4 Credits)

This course combines classroom-based learning with supervised action-oriented field research that emphasizes asset-based social change. Building upon student experiences and interests students will partner with a local urban school or community organization to identify a) core areas of research need; b) meaningful inquiry practices to illuminate these needs; and c) actions to address these needs. The course will culminate in a day of inquiry and action with our school/community partners.

Note(s): First years and sophomores should contact the instructor if they are interested in enrolling. As this course is an intensive fieldwork course, enrollment is capped at 15.

Meets the following Core requirements: Community Engagement

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EDUC 129: Schools, Sexuality, and Gender (3 Credits)

This course has two complementary aims: to ground students in queer theory and its usefulness for questioning normativity around gender and sexuality in education and to prepare students to be agents of change in making schools places that not only include LGBT and queer people but make the world more just for all. Topics include identity construction and intersection for teachers and students; “coming out” and “safe schools”; explicit and hidden curriculum about gender, sexuality, and family; and anti-oppressive education and student activism.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Women and Gender

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EDUC 130: History of Education in the United States (3 Credits)

Working chronologically from the colonial era to the present day, the course examines education at the elementary, secondary, and university level in political, economic, social, and cultural contexts. In addition to specific historical knowledge about the philosophy, processes, and outcomes of education, the course develops historical perspectives to help understand current issues in education including tensions around equity, excellence, assimilation, economic development, and democracy.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives

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EDUC 133: Curriculum and Environments in Early Childhood Education Programs (3 Credits)

Curriculum to facilitate age-appropriate learning in each area of development. Creative, thoughtful use of space and appropriate equipment and activities will be evaluated and explored. The creation and use of infant and toddler outdoor play areas as an extension of the classroom and how to create age-appropriate constructive and purposeful yard spaces for the preschool child will be discussed.

Note(s): Open to child development majors and graduate students in ECE.

EDUC 134: Research Methodology for Observing Children (4 Credits)

Focus on systematic techniques of observation and interpretation of children's behavior and development. Four hours of observation laboratory required weekly.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 140 or EDUC 136

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 134A: Research Methodology for Observing Children (3 Credits)

Focus on systematic techniques of observation and interpretation of children's behavior and development. Four hours of observation laboratory required weekly.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 140

Instructor Consent Required: Y

EDUC 135: EDUC ROLE OF THE FAMILY (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 136: Introduction to Development and Learning in Young Children (3 Credits)

Overview of developmental processes related to planning educational programs for young children, with an emphasis on cognitive development. Implications of physical, cognitive, affective, and social development for learning will be studied, all through a cultural lens. Content will cover typical and atypical development, prenatal through elementary.

Note(s): Required for all child development majors.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior, Multicultural Perspectives

View Course Goals

EDUC 137: Language Development: Literacy, bilingualism, and communication (3 Credits)

Theories and research on the stages of child language acquisition, first and second language learning, the relations between language, culture, and cognition, and the relations between the development of oral and written language and literacy. Students will complete mini research projects in one of these areas.

Note(s): Required for all child development majors.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior, Multicultural Perspectives

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EDUC 138: Social, Emotional, and Moral Development and Learning (3 Credits)

Theories and research on children's social, emotional, and moral development and relations to school learning. Students will complete mini research projects in relation to one of these areas.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 140

Note(s): Required for all child development majors.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 139: DEVEL, LEARN IN ADOLESCENTS (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 140: Hip Hop Pedagogy (3 Credits)

The course will draw connections between popular culture and "liberal learning," examining how hip-hop is related to the community while illustrating the principles of liberatory pedagogy. The course will examine theoretical and applied work that emphasizes education, hip-hop, and social capital.

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EDUC 141: THE ARTS IN A CHILD'S LIFE (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 142: The Hospitalized Child (3 Credits)

This course considers special problems arising through hospitalization of children from infancy through adolescence. It focuses on the psychological and social issues associated with illness and other traumatic life experiences in childhood. Developmental perspective used in this course has applicability for understanding children's responses to other critical experiences. The course is designed for, but not limited to, students interested in a career as child life specialists. The topics covered also prepare students for careers in education and mental health professions.

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EDUC 144: WORKING WITH PARENTS:LISTN,COM (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 153: Administering Early Childhood Programs (2 Credits)

Legal, ethical, and practical problems included in establishing, supervising, and directing preschools, day-care facilities, and other educational programs for young children. Work with parents, paraprofessionals, and professional teams. Project proposals, budgets, and professional reports.

EDUC 154: Medical Information: Children in Hospitals and Clinics (2 Credits)

Medical and physiological details of the chronic and acute illnesses for which children are hospitalized, as well as the attendant diagnostic and treatment procedures, defined and discussed with a view toward better understanding the impact of the experiences on children.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 142

Note(s): Prerequisites: EDUC 142, PSYC 140, or declared pre-health science majors with consent of instructor.

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EDUC 155: Children with Special Needs: Infants and Young Children (3 Credits)

This course focuses on neuro-diverse development and special education issues that arise in teaching infants and young children. The course examines the identification process of special needs and the evidence-based practices available to support infants and young children with special needs in their natural environments. The course aims to provide students with knowledge of developmental and behavioral characteristics of infants and young children, birth to five years, who have disabilities or are at- risk for developmental delay.

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EDUC 156: Grief & Loss: Children & Families (3 Credits)

This course is an experiential based seminar that will focus on grief and loss of children, adolescents, and families. The primary focus of the course will be to enhance your knowledge and understanding of how death, loss, grief,and loss bereavement impact children and families developmentally, psychosocially, socially and emotionally. Additionally, aspects of culture, religion, and social norms will be discussed and integrated into the course content. Students will be introduced to various theories including tasks, phases, stages, and approaches to grief and evidence based.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 142

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 158: Early Childhood Curricula for Children with Special Needs (3 Credits)

Describes major curriculum models developed for preschool special education. It provides a review of developmental, learning, and behavioral characteristics of young children (three to five years) with special needs in the context of early intervention strategies that facilitate optimal development and learning in the least restrictive environment. Includes specific topics such as the development of early literacy, preacademics, multicultural education for preschool children, interagency coordination, collaboration with families, and developmentally appropriate practice adapted for children

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 155

Note(s): There will be separate sections for graduates and undergraduates. This is the undergraduate section and it is restricted to child development majors.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

EDUC 160: History and Theories of Play in Human Development, Culture, and Education (3 Credits)

A study of theories of play in historical and contemporary perspectives, including explanations of play in human and animal behavior and the relationships of play to child development and cultural values. Issues about play and learning in childhood are explored through research, reading, and observation of children at play. Anthropology, psychology, sociology, and education are used as interdisciplinary sources for study and discussion.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Human Institutions and Behavior

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EDUC 161: Interpersonal Communication (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the theory and practice of dyadic communication, reduction of defensive climates as a means of facilitating effective communication, the role of communication in establishing and maintaining organizational cultures, and multicultural communication issues. Special emphasis on perception, interpersonal dynamics, conflict resolution, active listening skills, and verbal and nonverbal communication.

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EDUC 173A: Child Life Seminar & Clinical Skills (3 Credits)

Students will gain skills for professional and clinical child life practice. Clinical areas will include therapeutic play and child centered interventions, working with parents and the multidisciplinary team, and enhancing assessment and case formulation. Professional areas will include preparing for the child life exam, interview skills, and interpersonal communication skills.

Note(s): This course is only open to child life majors.

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EDUC 173B: Field Experience in Child Life in Hospitals II (2-6 Credits)

Students work in a hospital or clinic child life program or in a community agency serving children. Supervision is provided by the hospital staff or by agency staff and Mills faculty.

Note(s): Open to child life students only. Fieldwork hours individually arranged with hospital placement; time required varies according to credit received.

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EDUC 176: Leadership and Administration in Early Childhood Programs (3 Credits)

This course was developed to build a cadre of leaders and administrators with knowledge and competencies to implement thoughtful and creative approaches to maximizing the potential of programs in the field of ECE. Students explore the purposes inspiring their desire for leadership development and examine their personal strengths, vulnerabilities, values and goals influencing their desire to be leaders and administrators within the field of ECE. The course draws upon a range of theories, resources and relationships for understanding the early childhood field.

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EDUC 179: Directed Research (1-4 Credits)

EDUC 180: Special Topics in Education (3 Credits)

Exploration of themes and/or topics not offered as part of the regular curriculum. Course content to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

EDUC 180A: Substitute Teaching: Field Experience (1 Credits)

This course introduces students to the profession of teaching and supports them in applying for an emergency teaching credential to qualify as substitute teachers.

EDUC 180B: SPECIAL TOPICS (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 180C: Special Topics in Education (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 180J: Special Topics (3 Credits)

EDUC 183: Advanced Seminar in Education (3 Credits)

In-depth examination of and critical inquiry into a specific subject through shared readings, discussion, and written assignments. Course content to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

EDUC 191A: Theory and Practice of Early Childhood Education: Infancy/Young Children (4-6 Credits)

First of a two-semester series. Survey of theoretical bases of early childhood curriculum, examination of current practices, and application of theory through participation in a teaching team in an early childhood education setting under the supervision of the professional staff. Practicum hours consist of scheduled half-days each week in the classroom setting with daily sessions critiquing practice and a weekly seminar on the theoretical foundations.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 136 or EDUC 036 or EDUC 134

Note(s): Arrangements must be made in the spring prior to enrollment.

Meets the following Core requirements: Community Engagement

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EDUC 191B: Theory and Practice of ECE: Curriculum and Instruction for Infants and Toddlers with Special Needs (4-6 Credits)

Continuation of first-semester lecture and practicum, with focus on children with special needs. Survey of theoretical bases of early childhood curriculum, examination of current practices, and application of theory through participation in a teaching team under the supervision of the professional staff in the Children's School. Three half-days each week with daily sessions critiquing practice and a weekly seminar on the theoretical foundations.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 134 or EDUC 191A

Note(s): Child development majors. Check with advisor before enrolling.

Meets the following Core requirements: Community Engagement

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EDUC 194A: Senior Seminar: Child Development (3-4 Credits)

The first semester of each student's year-long documentary or field research project that investigates practical or theoretical aspects of the major. Students have the option of either completing a literature review or an empirical project.

Note(s): All child development majors take two semesters of Senior Seminar.

Meets the following Core requirements: Written and Oral Communication II

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EDUC 194B: Senior Seminar: Child Development II (3-4 Credits)

The second semester of each student's year-long research project that investigates practical or theoretical aspects of the major. Students will submit a research paper and give an oral presentation of their work.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 192A

Note(s): All child development majors take two semesters of EDUC 192 Senior Seminar.

Meets the following Core requirements: Create, Innovate & Experiment

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EDUC 201: Social Foundations of Education (3 Credits)

Overview of the historical, philosophical, and social influences shaping educational practices, beliefs, and goals through history, from the Greeks to the present, focusing on major historical events and selected educational reformers. This course (or an approved equivalent) is required for all credential candidates who earn master's degrees, and is strongly recommended for students in early childhood education. It is also recommended for all Mills students who are interested in schools and their role in society.

EDUC 202: Teaching for Diversity (4 Credits)

Emphasizes the effects of cultural, racial, gender, and social class influences on what children learn and how they are taught.

EDUC 203: Public Policy: Children, Youth, and Family Issues (2-4 Credits)

Provides an overview of theory and trends in public policy and federal programs affecting services for children and families. Examination of the networks of agencies, the legislative maze and process at both state and federal levels, advocacy and lobbying, and ways of identifying sources of funding in both the public and private sectors.

View Course Goals

EDUC 204: Instructional Leadership (4 Credits)

The course is designed to prepare administrators to lead faculties, staffs, and community members to informed and collaborative decisions about curriculum and instruction, consistent with constructivist learning theory and reflective practice. Students will study the history of curriculum development in the U.S.; contending philosophies and views on the purposes of education in American public schools; and current theories and principles regarding the design, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum and instruction for diverse learners.

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EDUC 205: Trauma Informed Leadership (3 Credits)

Note(s): This course is required for administrative credential students.

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EDUC 207A: Inquiry into the Teaching Process: Practice into Theory (4 Credits)

EDUC 207A is the first semester of the core course for the second year of the Master's in Education with an Emphasis in Teaching (MEET) Program. Drawing on the collective experiences of the teacher/learners in the class, a body of scholarship and writing of other practicing teachers, and the research literature of the university scholarly community, students hone their inquiry skills to collectively examine the phenomena of teaching and learning in urban school settings.

Note(s): Prerequisite: Must be a candidate for the master's in education with an emphasis in teaching (MEET) or consent of the instructor.

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EDUC 207B: Inquiry into the Teaching Process: Practice into Theory (4 Credits)

EDUC 207B is the second semester of the core class for MEET students. Continuing in the tradition of their first-semester work, students study current research on urban school teaching as they hone their skills of applying theory to understand and challenge their practice. In a similar fashion, they also work to hone their skills of drawing on instances of practice to challenge and better understand current educational theory.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 207A

Note(s): Prerequisite: Must be a candidate for the Master's in education with emphasis in teaching (MEET) or consent of the instructor.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 210: Communities, Schools, and Critical Social Theory (4 Credits)

This course examines the links between schools and the social structure—the social, economic and political factors that have shaped conditions in urban schools and communities. For instance, the socioeconomic context of urban schools provides an important examination of the role of schooling in a stratified society and provides the theoretical grounding for the course. Critical Social Theories of race/ethnicity, class, gender, and culture will be utilized as frameworks through which to explore the development and current conditions of urban communities, schools, and society.

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EDUC 210A: Research and Inquiry Methods in Education: MEET (3 Credits)

EDUC 210A is the first semester of the two-course inquiry and research sequence for MEET students. In this sequence, students review and analyze current and pertinent research literature. Students design and develop a series of inquiry projects. Drawing on the collective experiences of the teacher/learners in the class, a body of scholarship and writing of other practicing teachers, and the research literature of the university scholarly community, students collectively examine the phenomena of teaching and learning in urban school settings to begin a final Master's project.

Note(s): Prerequisite: Must be a candidate for the master's in education with an emphasis in teaching (MEET) or consent of the instructor.

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EDUC 210B: Research and Inquiry Methods in Education: MEET (3 Credits)

EDUC 210B is the final semester of the two-course inquiry and research sequence for MEET students. In this sequence, students review and analyze current and pertinent research literature. Students design and develop a series of inquiry projects, and present a final research project at the end of the semester. Through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, hands-on exercises, and workshops, this course provides students the continued support and guidance necessary to make progress on their master's degree project.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 207A

Note(s): Prerequisite: Must be a candidate for the Master's in education with emphasis in teaching (MEET) or consent of the instructor. Must have completed 210A.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 211A: Independent School Leadership I (4 Credits)

This course examines contemporary challenges for independent school leaders and utilizes the talents of prominent leaders in the field to share their expertise. The course focuses on practical applications of education research and theory with special emphasis on the implications for practice in independent schools. Various elements of independent school leadership will be presented such as fund development, budgeting, marketing, and public relations.

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EDUC 211B: Independent School Leadership II (4 Credits)

This course examines contemporary challenges for independent school leaders and utilizes the talents of prominent leaders in the field to share their expertise. The course focuses on practical applications of education research and theory with special emphasis on the implications for practice in independent schools. Various elements of independent school leadership will be presented such as community organizng and development, proactive problem solving and community partnerships.

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EDUC 214: Family Systems and Cultural Diversity: Connections with Schools, Communities, and Hospital Setting (3 Credits)

This course examines the significance of cultural values, traditions, and practices in child-rearing, health, and education for children. Understanding the needs of children in a multicultural society requires knowledge of child development including expertise on a wide range of biomedical factors affecting the child in the hospital, at school, and in various community settings. Equally important is the knowledge of and sensitivity to family culture and the ability to communicate with children and parents from diverse cultures.

Note(s): Meets the state requirements for early childhood special education certification. Meets the child life requirement for Family Systems learning as set forth by the Association of Child Life Professionals.

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EDUC 220: Urban Education (4-5 Credits)

This course focuses on various perspectives on urban education, conditions for teaching and learning in urban public schools, and current theories of pedagogy in urban classrooms along with a close examination of a few representative and critical issues. While our focus is on schools in the United States, we will broaden our discussion at times to examine the same issues from an international perspective. Central to our study is the organization and impact of key “opportunity structures,” most critically those of race and class, in urban schools and communities.

View Course Goals

EDUC 225: Inquiry and Action in Urban Contexts (3-4 Credits)

This course combines classroom-based learning with supervised action-oriented field research that emphasizes asset-based social change. Building upon student experiences and interests students will partner with a local urban school or community organization to identify a) core areas of research need; b) meaningful inquiry practices to illuminate these needs; and c) actions to address these needs. The course will culminate in a day of inquiry and action with our school/community partners.

Note(s): First years and sophomores should contact the instructor if they are interested in enrolling. As this course is an intensive fieldwork course, enrollment is capped at 15.

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EDUC 227: Issues of Race and Ethnicity in Education (4 Credits)

This course will explore the social, cultural, economic, pedagogical, and psychological experiences of race and ethnicity in schools and classrooms. We will focus on developing a deeper understanding of the ways race and ethnicity shape students' educational experiences; investigating why even well-meaning educational reforms often fail to adequately address racial and ethnic inequity in education; and exploring effective efforts to better address the needs of students of color and their families.

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EDUC 229: Schools, Sexuality, and Gender (4 Credits)

This course has two complementary aims: to ground students in queer theory and its usefulness for questioning normativity around gender and sexuality in education and to prepare students to be agents of change in making schools places that not only include LGBT and queer people but make the world more just for all. Topics include identity construction and intersection for teachers and students; “coming out” and “safe schools”; explicit and hidden curriculum about gender, sexuality, and family; and anti-oppressive education and student activism.

View Course Goals

EDUC 230: History of Education in the United States (4 Credits)

Working chronologically from the colonial era to the present day, the course examines education at the elementary, secondary, and university level in political, economic, social, and cultural contexts. In addition to specific historical knowledge about the philosophy, processes, and outcomes of education, the course develops historical perspectives to help understand current issues in education including tensions around equity, excellence, assimilation, economic development, and democracy.

View Course Goals

EDUC 231: Assessment and Intervention for Children with Special Needs (3 Credits)

Provides an overview of early childhood special needs assessment and intervention strategies. A variety of assessment techniques used in early childhood developmental diagnosis and program planning are included, along with demonstrations of the assessment tools and techniques, and models of planning individual programs for young children at risk in collaboration with families and community agencies.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 233: Curriculum and Environments in Early Childhood Education Programs (3 Credits)

This course looks at how learning environment is strategically designed to facilitate age-appropriate learning. Creative and thoughtful use of both indoor and outdoor spaces will be explored. Students will examine environmental elements such as color, lighting, texture, sound, and natural vs. synthetic material and understand how each element may impact learning and development.

Note(s): Open to child development majors and graduate students in ECE.

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EDUC 234: Research Methodology for Observing Children (3 Credits)

Focus on systematic techniques of observation and interpretation of children's behavior and development. Four hours of observation laboratory required weekly.

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EDUC 235: EDUC ROLE OF THE FAMILY (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 236: Development and Learning : Infancy through Adolescence (3 Credits)

Overview of developmental processes related to planning educational programs for the preschool- and elementary school-aged child, with an emphasis on cognitive development. Implications of physical, cognitive, affective, and social development will be studied. Techniques for assessing individual development within clinical and classroom settings will be discussed and tried. Theories of development, particularly those of Piaget and Vygotsky, will be considered in light of educational issues such as developmental, cultural, socioeconomic, and linguistic differences.

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EDUC 237: Language Development: Literacy, bilingualism, and communication (3 Credits)

Theories and research on the stages of child language acquisition, first and second language learning, the relations between language, culture, and cognition, and the relations between the development of oral and written language and literacy. Students will complete mini research projects in one of these areas.

Note(s): Required for all child development majors.

View Course Goals

EDUC 238: Social, Emotional, and Moral Development and Learning (3 Credits)

Theories and research on children's social, emotional, and moral development and its relation to school learning. Students will complete mini research projects in relation to one of these areas.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 140

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 240: Hip Hop Pedagogy (4 Credits)

The course will draw connections between popular culture and "liberal learning," examining how hip-hop is related to the community while illustrating the principles of liberatory pedagogy. The course will examine theoretical and applied work that emphasizes education, hip-hop, and social capital.

View Course Goals

EDUC 241: THE ARTS IN A CHILD'S LIFE (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 241A: Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Waldorf Education (3 Credits)

This course explores Waldorf education and is designed for public school teachers. Waldorf education is developmentally appropriate, experiential, and academically rigorous. This course also integrates the Waldorf approach to serving traumatized children and youth.

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EDUC 242: The Hospitalized Child (3 Credits)

This course considers special problems arising through hospitalization of children from infancy through adolescence. It focuses on the psychological and social issues associated with illness and other traumatic life experiences in childhood. Developmental perspective used in this course has applicability for understanding children's responses to other critical experiences. The course is designed for, but not limited to, students interested in a career as child life specialists. The topics covered also prepare students for careers in education and mental health professions.

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EDUC 242A: Project Based Learning in Waldorf Education (2 Credits)

In this course students will apply Waldorf theory through creating units of study for students. The units of study produced will include classroom activities and assignments that will reflect an understanding of Waldorf education.

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EDUC 244: WORKING WITH PARENTS:LISTN,COM (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 246: Working with Schools, Families and the Community (2-4 Credits)

This course will prepare educators to be culturally responsive professionals. Students will explore what a community is, how it functions, its role in education, and how to develop strategies for building community within institutions supporting the care, education, and development of youth. Students will develop practical communication skills that will enhance their ability to work with all members of the community toward the education of children and youth.

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EDUC 250: Thesis for the Degree of Master of Arts in Education (4 Credits)

EDUC 252: Supervision of Adults in Children's Programs (2 Credits)

Working successfully with adults is a key skill needed for leaders in early childhood programs. This course will look at the literature examining adult learning styles, leadership, and organizational and staff development. Methodologies such as mentoring, coaching, and team building will be explored, with analyses on when and how each is appropriate and most effective. Self-reflection on students' own learning styles and adult communication will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 253

Instructor Consent Required: Y

EDUC 253: Child Life Seminar & Clinical Skills (3 Credits)

Students will gain skills for professional and clinical child life practice. Clinical areas will include therapeutic play and child centered interventions, working with parents and the multidisciplinary team, and enhancing assessment and case formulation. Professional areas will include preparing for the child life exam, interview skills, and interpersonal communication skills.

Note(s): Only child life student's may take this course

View Course Goals

EDUC 254: Medical Information: Children in Hospitals and Clinics (2 Credits)

Medical and physiological details of the chronic and acute illnesses for which children are hospitalized, as well as the attendant diagnostic and treatment procedures, defined and discussed with a view toward better understanding the impact of the experiences on children.

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EDUC 255: Children with Special Needs: Infants and Young Children (3 Credits)

This course focuses on neuro-diverse development and special education issues that arise in teaching infants and young children. The course examines the identification process of special needs and the evidence-based practices available to support infants and young children with special needs in their natural environments. The course aims to provide students with knowledge of developmental and behavioral characteristics of infants and young children, birth to five years, who have disabilities or are at- risk for developmental delay.

Note(s): Instructor consent required.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 256: Grief & Loss: Children & Families (3 Credits)

This course is an experiential based seminar that will focus on grief and loss of children, adolescents, and families. The primary focus of the course will be to enhance your knowledge and understanding of how death, loss, grief,and loss bereavement impact children and families developmentally, psychosocially, socially and emotionally. Additionally, aspects of culture, religion, and social norms will be discussed and integrated into the course content. Students will be introduced to various theories including tasks, phases, stages, and approaches to grief and evidence based.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 242

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 258: Early Childhood Curricula for Children with Special Needs (4 Credits)

Describes major curriculum models for early intervention and pre-K special education. Reviews developmental and behavioral characteristics of young children with special needs and the intervention strategies that facilitate optimal learning in the least restrictive environment. Includes specific topics such as the development of early literacy and preacademics, multicultural education for preschool children, interagency coordination, collaboration with families, and developmentally appropriate practice adapted for children with disabilities.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 255

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 260: History and Theories of Play in Human Development, Culture, and Education (3-3 Credits)

A study of theories of play in historical and contemporary perspectives, including explanations of play in human and animal behavior and the relationships of play to child development and cultural values. Issues about play and learning in childhood are explored through research, reading, and observation of children at play. Anthropology, psychology, sociology, and education are used as interdisciplinary sources for study and discussion.

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EDUC 261: Interpersonal Communication (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the theory and practice of dyadic communication, reduction of defensive climates as a means of facilitating effective communication, the role of communication in establishing and maintaining organizational cultures, and multicultural communication issues. Special emphasis on perception, interpersonal dynamics, conflict resolution, active listening skills, and verbal and nonverbal communication.

EDUC 263: Administrative Practicum in Early Childhood Programs (3 Credits)

Teaching and administrative experiences in preschool and primary grades or healthcare settings.

Note(s): Can be taken two times for credit.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 265: Child Development for Early Childhood Leaders (4 Credits)

An overview of sociocultural-sociohistorical theories of human development and learning with a particular focus on the unique contributions of Barbara Rogoff’s theory of guided participation.

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EDUC 273A: Child Life Seminar & Clinical Skills (3 Credits)

Students will gain skills for professional and clinical child life practice. Clinical areas will include therapeutic play and child centered interventions, working with parents and the multidisciplinary team, and enhancing assessment and case formulation. Professional areas will include preparing for the child life exam, interview skills, and interpersonal communication skills.

Note(s): This course is only open to child life majors.

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EDUC 273B: Field Experience in Child Life in Hospitals II (3 Credits)

Students work in a hospital or clinic child life program or in a community agency serving children. Supervision is provided by the hospital staff or by agency staff and Mills faculty.

Note(s): Open to child life students only. Fieldwork hours individually arranged with hospital placement; time required varies according to credit received.

EDUC 275: Field Experience in Early Childhood Settings (2-4 Credits)

Graduate students in early childhood special education work in early intervention and preschool placements under the supervision of school staff and a Mills supervisor. Graduate students in the Leadership in Early Childhood Education Program work in settings such as early care and education, family service centers, child mental health consultation agencies, child care resource and referral agencies, legislative offices, public benefit law firms, and charitable foundations, under the guidance of Mills faculty and site supervisors.

Note(s): Will be offered in the summer as well as fall and spring.

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EDUC 275A: Field Experience in Early Childhood Special Ed and Infant Mental Health (3 Credits)

Graduate students who are working on their early childhood special education specialist credential will work in early intervention and preschool placements under the supervision of school staff and a Mills supervisor. Graduate students who are working in the field of Infant Mental Health will work in their respective placements under the supervision of a cooperative clinician and a Mills field supervisor. Hours of seminar are arranged with the Mills supervisor.

Note(s): This is a field seminar that's taken in conjunction with student internship. This graduate course is used to satisfy credentialing or license requirement for students on a career track who are enrolled in the graduate programs.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 275B: Field Experience in Early Childhood Special Ed and Infant Mental Health (3 Credits)

Graduate students who are working on their early childhood special education specialist credential will work in early intervention and preschool placements under the supervision of school staff and a Mills supervisor. Hours of seminar are arranged with the Mills supervisor.

Note(s): Education 275B is a class that accompanies field placement in early childhood special education. Students enrolled in this class must be doing student teaching and have passed the CBEST test.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 276: Leadership and Administration in Early Childhood Programs (3 Credits)

This course was developed to build a cadre of leaders and administrators with knowledge and competencies to implement thoughtful and creative approaches to maximizing the potential of programs in the field of ECE. Students explore the purposes inspiring their desire for leadership development and examine their personal strengths, vulnerabilities, values and goals influencing their desire to be leaders and administrators within the field of ECE. The course draws upon a range of theories, resources and relationships for understanding the early childhood field.

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EDUC 276A: Leadership in Early Childhood Seminar (2-4 Credits)

This seminar accompanies the fieldwork component of the Leadership in Early Childhood Education Program. Goals of the seminar include the connection of theory, policy, and systems analysis to the practical experience gleaned from the field placement. Students will keep ongoing journals and conduct inquiry projects under the guidance of both Mills faculty and the supervisors in the field.

Note(s): Restricted to students enrolled in the Leadership in Early Childhood Education Program. Offered summer, fall, and spring

EDUC 276B: Leadership in Early Childhood Seminar (2-4 Credits)

This seminar accompanies the fieldwork component of the Leadership in Early Childhood Education Program. Goals of the seminar include the connection of theory, policy, and systems analysis to the practical experience gleaned from the field placement. Students will keep ongoing journals and conduct inquiry projects under the guidance of both Mills faculty and the supervisors in the field.

Note(s): Restricted to students enrolled in the Leadership in Early Childhood Education Program. Offered summer, fall, and spring

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EDUC 276C: Leadership in Early Childhood Seminar (2-4 Credits)

This seminar accompanies the fieldwork component of the Leadership in Early Childhood Education Program. Goals of the seminar include the connection of theory, policy, and systems analysis to the practical experience gleaned from the field placement. Students will keep ongoing journals and conduct inquiry projects under the guidance of both Mills faculty and the supervisors in the field.

Note(s): Restricted to students enrolled in the Leadership in Early Childhood Education Program.

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EDUC 277: Special Education Pre-Induction Seminar (1 Credits)

This course discusses and integrates the core academic and non-college activities to be taken under the professional level II early childhood special education specialist credential. Students meet with the College advisor and support provider to develop a professional induction plan that outlines specific course work, individual performance goals, and professional non-college activities.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

EDUC 278: Special Education Post-Induction Seminar (1 Credits)

This course is the final process in obtaining the professional level II early childhood special education specialist credential. Students meet with the College advisor and the field support provider to evaluate the completion of the professional induction plan and the credential program.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

EDUC 280: Special Topics in Education (4 Credits)

Exploration of themes and/or topics not offered as part of the regular curriculum. Course content to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

EDUC 280A: Special Topics (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 280AS: Research Seminar in Child Life (3 Credits)

This seminar and workshop-based course is open to education graduate students in the Child Life program. Students will read, review, and discuss interdisciplinary research in the field of Child Life. Students will learn to critically evaluate research on children's learning and development. Students will develop a written research proposal by the end of the course, with plans for data collection.

Note(s): Open only to students enrolled in the Child Life program.

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EDUC 280B: Inquiry, Teacher Research and Documentation: U.S. and International Perspectives (3 Credits)

This course will cover the Reggio Emilia practice.

EDUC 280C: Special Topics in Education (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 280D: Special Topics in Education (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 280E: Special Topics in Education (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 280F: Special Topics in Education (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 280J: Special Topics (4 Credits)

EDUC 283: Advanced Seminar (1 Credits)

EDUC 290: Advanced Seminar in Child Development (3 Credits)

Advanced seminar in theories of child development and the application of developmental theory to early childhood educational practice.

Note(s): Limited to early childhood and early childhood leadership graduate students.

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EDUC 290A: ADV SEM IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 290B: ADV SEM IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT (0.25-1 Credits)

EDUC 291A: Theory and Practice of Early Childhood Education 0-8: Infancy and Preschoolers (3 Credits)

First of a two-semester series. Survey of theoretical bases of early childhood curriculum, examination of current practices, and application of theory through participation in a teaching team under the supervision of the professional staff in the Children's School. Three half-days each week with daily sessions critiquing practice and a weekly seminar on the theoretical foundations.

Note(s): Arrangements must be made in the spring prior to enrollment.

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EDUC 291B: Theory and Practice of ECE: Curriculum & Instruction for Infants and Preschoolers with Special Needs (3 Credits)

Lecture and associated practicum with focus on children with special needs in early childhood education. Survey of theoretical bases of early childhood curriculum, examination of current practices, and application of theory through participation in a teaching team under the supervision of the professional staff in the Children's School. Three half-days each week with daily sessions critiquing practice and a weekly seminar on the theoretical foundations of curriculum and instruction with children who have special needs.

Note(s): Arrangements must be made in the fall prior to enrollment. Prerequisite EDUC 291A or permission of instructor.

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EDUC 292: GRAD SEM:RESEARCH IN EDUC (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 293A: Graduate Seminar: Research in Education—MEET (4 Credits)

In this first semester of the two-course research series EDUC 293A and 293B, students review and analyze current and pertinent research literature. Students design and develop a research project proposal to be submitted for approval by the Committee for Protection of Human Subjects. To advance from 293A to 293B, the student must submit a proposal for review by the end of the fall semester.

Note(s): Required for MEET candidates. Other students may take the course with the approval of the instructor and the School of Education.

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EDUC 293B: Research Seminar—MEET (4 Credits)

Through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, hands-on exercises, and workshops, this course, the second in the master's degree research project sequence for MEET students, provides the continued support and guidance necessary to complete their master's degree research project. This course is a continuation of EDUC 293A.

Note(s): Required for MEET candidates. Other students may take the course with the approval of the instructor and the School of Education.

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EDUC 294A: Graduate Seminar: Research in Education—ECE (3 Credits)

Review and critical analysis of current educational research. Includes designing and, where appropriate, initiating a pilot research study. This course is the first in the two-course research series EDUC 294A and EDUC 294B. There are two sections of EDUC 294A: section one is for ECE/DPT and SPED students; section two is for child life and ECE students.

Note(s): For ECE and Education graduate students. Other students may take the course with special approval of the instructor and the department. Two sections are offered: section one is for ECE/DPT and SPED students; section two is for child life and ECE students.

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EDUC 294B: Research Seminar—ECE (3 Credits)

Through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, hands-on exercises, and workshops, this course, the second in the master's degree research project sequence for ECE/DPT, SPED, and child life students, provides the continued support and guidance necessary to complete their master's degree research projects. This course is a continuation of EDUC 294A. There are two sections of EDUC 294B: section one is for ECE/DPT and SPED students; section two is for child life and ECE students.

Note(s): For ECE and education graduate students. Other students may take the course with special approval of the instructor and the department. Offered in two sections: section one is for ECE/DPT and SPED students; section two is for child life and ECE students.

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EDUC 300A: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School (3 Credits)

EDUC 300A and 300B present an overview of curriculum and instruction issues for all elementary credential candidates. Fall: general approaches to classroom management, lesson planning, and methods of teaching and assessment in diverse settings are considered through the lenses of equity and social justice. Spring: these ideas are applied to specific areas¿social studies, science, art, music, drama, and physical education. Review of health-related issues, including mainstreaming, are examined throughout the year.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates admitted to the education 4+1 program and graduate students enrolled in the MSK credential program.

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EDUC 300B: Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School (3 Credits)

EDUC 300A and 300B present an overview of curriculum and instruction issues for all elementary credential candidates. Fall: general approaches to classroom management, lesson planning, and methods of teaching and assessment in diverse settings are considered through the lenses of equity and social justice. Spring: these ideas are applied to specific areas—social studies, science, art, music, drama, and physical education. Review of health-related issues, including mainstreaming, are examined throughout the year.

Note(s): Open only to undergraduates admitted to the education 4+1 program and graduate students enrolled in the MSK credential program

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EDUC 301A: Curriculum and Instruction for Secondary Teachers (3 Credits)

The first of a two-semester series. Provides core instructional component for secondary credential candidates in art, English, and social studies. Includes overview of issues of curriculum and instruction for secondary classrooms. Structure of knowledge in content areas as basis for understanding curricular planning as student-teacher considers what and how to teach, and for what reasons. Other topics include instructional/classroom management strategies, planning and assessment, and mandated state and local frameworks for secondary subjects.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates with instructor approval.

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EDUC 301B: Curriculum and Instruction for Secondary Teachers (3 Credits)

The second of a two-semester series. Provides core instructional component for secondary credential candidates in art, English, and social studies. Includes overview of issues of curriculum and instruction for secondary classrooms. Structure of knowledge in content areas as basis for understanding curricular planning as student-teacher considers what and how to teach, and for what reasons. Other topics include instructional/classroom management strategies, planning and assessment, and mandated state and local frameworks for secondary subjects.

Note(s): Must be enrolled in the TTS Humanities program

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EDUC 302A: Introduction to the Humanities (2 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to promote an understanding of the Humanities as an interdisciplinary curricular area. The course emphasizes how the Humanities moves us toward complex engagements with the human condition through the study of history, literature, language, philosophy, and the arts. Students will (1) explore what characterizes a Humanities curriculum, (2) what learning activities, assessments/evaluations, and desired outcomes of such a curriculum could be, and (3) how such a curriculum can be developed in for the different kinds of humans (i.e., students) in secondary schools.

Note(s): Open to students enrolled in the Single Subject Humanities cohort of the Teacher Education program

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EDUC 302B: Introduction to the Humanities (3 Credits)

Understanding the humanities (art, english, history, social studies) as curricular areas. Understanding the interdisciplinary nature of these areas of study.

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EDUC 303: Teaching Children Mathematics (4 Credits)

The course explores recommendations from research, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the California Department of Education, and others about appropriate elementary school mathematics education. The three-fold emphasis will be on how to plan and enact mathematical lessons, how to understand and promote students’ mathematical thinking, and how to provide children a balanced program of mathematical study that results in conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, and sound reasoning. The great diversity found in California classrooms will be a prime consideration.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 300A

Note(s): Admission to Teachers for Tomorrow's Schools Credential Program is required for graduates. Undergraduates must have advisor and instructor approval and intend to apply for Teachers for Tomorrow's Schools Credential Program. All enrollees must have elementary school field placements.

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EDUC 303A: Teaching Children Mathematics and Science I (3 Credits)

This course is designed to familiarize students with pedagogy and content knowledge required for the teaching of math and science in elementary schools with diverse learners. An interdisciplinary approach will be taken that incorporates both math and science teaching and learning with a focus on how these subjects inform and build on one another. We will engage with relevant recent research, current standards, and state frameworks in order to understand our role as elementary math and science educators. We will also work to explore both the place of math and science in the elementary school.

Note(s): Restricted to students enrolled in Teachers for Tomorrow's Schools. Graduate students, and Seniors accepted into the 4+1 Teachers for Tomorrow's Schools program, do not need instructor permission. Undergraduate Juniors who intend to apply to Teachers for Tomorrow's Schools should secure instructor permission.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 303B: Teaching Children Mathematics II (3 Credits)

This course is designed to familiarize students with current recommendations from recent research, the state of California, and other experienced educators on the content of elementary school mathematics and on the strategies for the teaching of that content to diverse populations of students. This is part two of a two-part sequence.

Note(s): Prereq EDUC 303A or permission of instructor.Restricted to students in Teachers for Tomorrow's Schools. Graduate students and Seniors accepted into the 4+1 Teachers for Tomorrow's Schools program do not need instructor permission. Undergraduate Juniors who intend to apply to Teachers for Tomorrow's Schools should secure instructor permission.

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EDUC 305A: Instruction for Secondary Math and Science Teachers (3 Credits)

Two semester-long courses provide core instructional component for secondary math and science credential candidates. Includes an overview of issues of curriculum and instruction for secondary classrooms. Structure of knowledge in content areas is used as basis for understanding curricular planning as the student-teacher considers what and how to teach, and for what reasons. Also includes instructional/classroom management strategies, planning, technology, assessment for secondary classrooms, and mandated state and local frameworks for secondary subjects.

Note(s): Open to students enrolled in Mills’s teacher credential programs or undergraduates by permission of the instructor.

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EDUC 305B: Teaching Methods for Integrated Secondary Science and Math Instruction (3 Credits)

The second of a two-semester series demonstrates approaches to and materials for the activity-oriented interdisciplinary teaching of science and mathematics. Students will be required to design and implement lessons in their student teaching assignments that manifest techniques and approaches shown. California Science and Mathematics Frameworks and adolescent cognition theories will help students assess effectiveness of their teaching and curriculum.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 305A

Note(s): Graduate Students enrolled in the Teaching Credential Program who have passed the required exams (CBEST, CEST)

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EDUC 313: Introduction to Computers in Education (2 Credits)

Study of development and learning used to analyze issues and trends in applying computers to public school disciplines. Course provides students in credential programs experience in using databases, spreadsheets, and word processing for classroom record keeping, curriculum development, and assignment and test question preparation. Students will explore and evaluate software currently available for use in developing student skills or enhancing education through use of simulations or experiments in different academic and vocational disciplines taught in schools.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

EDUC 315: INTRO TO ADMINISTRATION (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 317: ADMIN LEADERSHIP THEORY,CNCPTS (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 318: INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 319: COMMUNITY RELATIONS (0.5 Credits)

EDUC 320: SCHOOL LAW & PUBLIC POLICY (0.5 Credits)

EDUC 321: HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (0.5 Credits)

EDUC 322: FISCAL & BUSINESS SERVICES (0.5 Credits)

EDUC 323: FIELDWORK AND SEMINAR (1 Credits)

EDUC 324: FIELDWORK AND SEMINAR (1 Credits)

EDUC 339: Development and Learning in Adolescents (3 Credits)

Overview of developmental processes related to planning educational programs for the junior and senior high school student. Implications for the physical, cognitive, affective, and social growth characteristics of adolescents, and techniques and materials for assessing individual development studied. Reviews health-related issues with implications for educators, professionals in the field of health and child welfare, and parents. Health curricula for children and adolescents examined. Community health resources most frequently utilized by educators and families identified.

Note(s): By permission of instructor.

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EDUC 347A: Introduction to the Profession of Teaching Diverse Learners (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the issues and dilemmas facing educators and the profession of teaching. The course is designed to assist students in making the transition from student to teacher by examining in depth their assumptions about teaching, learning, and schooling. The course focuses considerable attention on the moral and ethical dimensions of the teacher's work, and on the complexities of teaching in settings characterized by diversity.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates admitted to the education 4+1 program.

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EDUC 347B: Introduction to the Profession of Teaching Diverse Learners (3 Credits)

347B is the second semester of the 347 course sequence. It is designed to provide a continued examination of the themes and issues raised in 347A. The second semester theme emphases include: teaching as moral work, teacher as curriculum developer, inquiry as the methodology for on-going teacher learning, and the importance of teacher “vision” to guide practice. The course maintains a continued focus on the urban school context, which is characterized by diversity.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 347A

Note(s): Open only to graduate students in Teachers for Tomorrow's Schools.

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EDUC 348: Building Structures for Equity, Excellence, and Access (2 Credits)

A laboratory workshop must be taken concurrently or after EDUC 347A. The purpose of this laboratory is to explore issues involved in becoming a teacher-leader for educational equity. This course will have students examine personal, interpersonal, and institutional impacts of the intersection of oppressions surrounding race, ethnicity, language, gender, and class. The central question for the course is: how can we teach each child well in a racist society?

Note(s): Open to students enrolled in Mills' teacher credential programs or undergraduates by permission of the instructor

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EDUC 349: Perspectives on Disability, Inclusion, and Assessment (2 Credits)

This course uses a Disability Studies framework to explore the social, political, historical, cultural, and educational contexts of disability and special education both nationally and in California. Students will explore how disability is both constructed and reclaimed as well as the material realities connected to disability. Students will take a capacity-oriented approach to examine the history of special education, legislation and litigation that have influenced the field, referral and assessment processes, various models of service delivery, and attitudes toward people with disabilities.

Note(s): Undergraduates need permission of the instructors.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 352: English Language Development and Content Instruction Methods-Multiple Subj. (3 Credits)

An exploration of teaching practice for multiple subject preservice teachers of English learners that is informed by second language acquisition theory and research. Through demonstrations and analyses of tasks associated with the teaching of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills as well as readings, in-class discussions, and lectures, students will develop the pedagogical skills and theoretical expertise to teach both English and subject-matter content to English-language learners. An additional 3 to 5 hours of field work in local schools required every week for undergraduates.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates with instructor approval.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 353: English Language Development and Content Instruction Methods-Single Subj. (3 Credits)

An exploration of teaching practice for single subject preservice teachers of English learners, informed by second language acquisition theory and research. Through demonstrations and analyses of tasks associated with the teaching of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills as well as readings, in-class discussions, and lectures, students will develop the pedagogical skills and theoretical expertise to teach both English and subject-matter content to English-language learners. An additional three to five hours of field work in local schools required every week for undergraduates

Note(s): Open to undergraduates with instructor approval.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 354: BILINGUAL ENGL DEV-ELEMENTARY (0.5 Credits)

EDUC 355: BILINGUAL ENGL DEV-SECONDARY (0.5 Credits)

EDUC 373A: Student Teaching in the Elementary School (2-12 Credits)

The first in a two-semester fieldwork sequence for elementary credential students. The graduated introduction to full classroom teaching responsibility begins during the fall semester with observation, classroom assistance in the form of individual tutoring, small group leadership, and team teaching.

Note(s): Only for graduate students enrolled in the MSK or MSP credential programs and for students pursuing the undergraduate 4+1 program.

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EDUC 373B: Student Teaching in the Elementary School (2-12 Credits)

Second semester of two-semester fieldwork sequence for elementary credential students. The graduated introduction to full classroom teaching responsibility begins during the fall semester with observation, classroom assistance in the form of individual tutoring, small group leadership, and team teaching. During the second semester, the student will gradually assume responsibility for planning and teaching all parts of the curriculum.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 373A

Note(s): Open only to graduate students enrolled in the MSK credential program

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EDUC 379: Teaching Reading, Language Arts and Literature in Elementary School (3 Credits)

Two-semester sequence: EDUC 379 and 380. Reading instruction in elementary school, including development of oral language and listening comprehension as a basis for learning to read; English language structure; planning, organizing, and managing reading instruction based on ongoing assessment; word analysis; fluency; vocabulary; academic language and background knowledge; and comprehension. Awareness and planning for cultural, linguistic, and ethnic diversity, and for children with special needs, will be stressed. Three to five hours of fieldwork in schools also required for undergraduates.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates with instructor approval.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 379A: Teaching Reading and LA: Elem. (3 Credits)

Note(s): Open to undergraduates with instructor approval.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 379B: Teaching Lang Arts: Elementary (3 Credits)

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 379

Note(s): Permission of instructor required for undergraduates.

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EDUC 380: Teaching Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary School (3 Credits)

Methods, materials for planning, and evaluating instruction of reading and language arts in the elementary school. Classroom organization, planning for small group and individual instruction, and diagnostic techniques for assessing progress. Attention given to techniques for teaching reading and language arts for student use in different contexts. Appreciation for cultural and linguistic diversity and importance in language arts instruction emphasized. The teaching of writing is the focus in this course. Three to five hours of fieldwork in schools also required for undergraduates.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 379

Note(s): Permission of instructor required for undergraduates.

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EDUC 385A: Student Teaching in the Secondary School I (2 Credits)

First part of a two-semester fieldwork sequence for secondary credential students. The introduction to classroom teaching responsibility begins during the fall semester with observation, individual tutoring, small group leadership, and team teaching. By the end of the first semester, the student-teacher assumes full responsibility for a unit of classroom instruction. Team teaching, observation, and assistance in additional classes may also be part of fieldwork.

Note(s): Open only to single subject teaching credential students

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EDUC 385B: Student Teaching in the Secondary School II (2 Credits)

Part two of a two-semester fieldwork sequence for secondary credential students. The introduction to classroom teaching responsibility continues during the spring semester with the student-teacher assuming full responsibility for a minimum of one unit of classroom instruction. Team teaching, observation, and assistance in additional classes are also part of the fieldwork experience during the spring.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 385A

Note(s): Open only to single subject teaching credential students.

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EDUC 389: Teaching Reading and Writing in the Secondary Schools (3 Credits)

Application of theory and methods of instruction to improve reading and writing skills in middle school and high school. Consideration of problems in reading and writing about specific content areas, assessment and remediation of students with limited literacy skills, enhancement of the literacy skills of gifted and talented students, and techniques for improving the literacy of students for whom English is a second language. An additional three to five hours of fieldwork in local schools required every week for undergraduates.

Note(s): Open to undergraduates with instructor approval.

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EDUC 393: Topics in Chemistry (2 Credits)

A survey of recent major developments in chemistry. Designed to provide a background for teaching in the secondary school.

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EDUC 394: Topics in Mathematics (2 Credits)

Topics chosen to provide a background for teaching in the secondary school.

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EDUC 397: TOPICS IN ENGLISH (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 398A: TEACH METH/SECND SCI&MATH (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 398B: TEACH METH SECND SCI&MATH (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 399: Cont Professional Training (0 Credits)

EDUC 401: School Leadership (4 Credits)

Core course for students seeking the administrative services credential (ASC). Along with study of the changing nature of leadership, students will examine the changing role and nature of the public school leader. Students will study and experience some key challenges of the job: leading faculty, parents, students, and other constituents toward leveraging the school's resources and talents to the levels needed to create the optimum conditions for teaching and learning.

Note(s): Only open to graduate students in educational leadership.

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EDUC 403: Administrative Leadership: Theory, Concepts, and Practice (4 Credits)

This course explores and reflects on various, sometimes contending, purposes of education. Related theories of leadership, strategies, and practices will be the basis for the development of a personal professional perspective, including a philosophy of education and leadership and a conception of the educational system. Draws from literature on leadership, management, organizational behavior, and systems analysis, along with other relevant studies.

EDUC 404: Instructional Leadership (4 Credits)

The course is designed to prepare administrators to lead faculties, staffs, and community members to informed and collaborative decisions about curriculum and instruction, consistent with constructivist learning theory and reflective practice. Students will study the history of curriculum development in the U.S.; contending philosophies and views on the purposes of education in American public schools; and current theories and principles regarding the design, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum and instruction for diverse learners.

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EDUC 405: Trauma Informed Leadership (4 Credits)

This course is designed to help students preparing to be public school administrators develop personal insights, interpersonal skills, and management practices for leading diverse, inclusive programs and organizations with a focus on trauma-informed educational practices and English Language Learner (ELL) programs. This course will introduce students to the core concepts (general theory and foundational knowledge), informing evidence-based assessment and intervention for traumatized children and adolescents. Strength-based practice will be highlighted along with a focus on the identification

Note(s): This course is required for administrative credential students.

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EDUC 406: Fiscal and Business Services (2 Credits)

This course challenges the view that the primary role of business managers should be as guardians of budget limits. Instead, it explores the use of business services as a primary instrument for achieving school and district educational goals. Students will learn to assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefits of programs, and to coordinate, leverage, and converge resources toward creating optimum conditions for teaching and learning.

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EDUC 407: Perspectives on Human Resource Management (4 Credits)

This course prepares future administrators with theory, knowledge, skills, and sensibilities to attract, select, and develop personnel; create policies and conditions to retain the best; and provide opportunities for their growth and advancement to enhance the quality of education for students. This course draws from the substantial literature on the management of human resources, organizational development, human relations, professional development, and other areas of study relevant to the purposes of this course.

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EDUC 408: FIELD EXPERIENCE (0.25-1.25 Credits)

EDUC 409A: Field Experience (4 Credits)

Places students in administrative settings to conduct projects, preferably collaboratively with a group of teachers who will provide them with leadership experiences where they can apply course work, including theory, concepts, and strategies. The intent is to enable the students to begin to develop competencies necessary to lead and manage an organization or group to attain its goals effectively, efficiently, and with integrity.

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EDUC 409B: Field Experience (4 Credits)

Places students in administrative settings to conduct projects, preferably collaboratively with a group of teachers who will provide them with leadership experiences where they can apply course work, including theory, concepts, and strategies. The intent is to enable the students to begin to develop competencies necessary to lead and manage an organization or group to attain its goals effectively, efficiently, and with integrity.

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EDUC 410: Communities, Schools, and Critical Social Theory (4 Credits)

This course examines the links between schools and the social structure—the social, economic and political factors that have shaped conditions in urban schools and communities. For instance, the socioeconomic context of urban schools provides an important examination of the role of schooling in a stratified society and provides the theoretical grounding for the course. Critical Social Theories of race/ethnicity, class, gender, and culture will be utilized as frameworks through which to explore the development and current conditions of urban communities, schools, and society.

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EDUC 411A: Independent School Leadership I (4 Credits)

This course examines contemporary challenges for independent school leaders and utilizes the talents of prominent leaders in the field to share their expertise. The course focuses on practical applications of education research and theory with special emphasis on the implications for practice in independent schools. Various elements of independent school leadership will be presented such as fund development, budgeting, marketing, and public relations.

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EDUC 411B: Independent School Leadership II (4 Credits)

This course examines contemporary challenges for independent school leaders and utilizes the talents of prominent leaders in the field to share their expertise. The course focuses on practical applications of education research and theory with special emphasis on the implications for practice in independent schools. Various elements of independent school leadership will be presented such as community organizing and development, proactive problem solving, and community partnerships.

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EDUC 412: School Law and Public Policy (2 Credits)

This course is designed to develop students' knowledge and understanding of the crucial role of the ethical and legal execution, formulation, and enforcement of policy in the successful management of schools and school systems. Students will review the California Educational Code, examples of school policies, and the administrator's role in both executing and formulating policy. Emphasis will be placed on the interpretation of law in serving the educational interests of students and families.

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EDUC 413: Qualitative Methods (4 Credits)

As applications of inquiry in school settings require more holistic and site-specific research designs, this course prepares students' use of qualitative research tools by introducing concepts of grounded theory and theoretical sensitivity in designing field methods. Fieldwork methods, strategies for qualitative observation, interviewing, and accurate and detailed field notes are included. Analysis strategies, case development, cross-case comparison, pattern matching, and theme mapping are used to illustrate ways of working with qualitative data.

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EDUC 414: Quantitative Methods (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the application of quantitative methods in educational research. Major topics include formulation and testing of hypotheses, sampling, establishing validity and reliability, and instrumentation. Examples of various types of observation and survey instruments are used to illustrate the uses and limitations of such tools. The forms and uses of standard design (such as pre- and post-testing) and their applications to specific interventions or research questions are covered.

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EDUC 417: INDIV PROFESSIONAL DEVEL PLAN (0.5-1 Credits)

EDUC 417A: Leadership Induction A (2 Credits)

As required by the California Credential Accreditation Commission, candidates for the administration services credential (ASC) develop, in consultation with their advisor, an individualized professional plan that maps out course work as well as non-college experiences that lead to the development of required competencies.

Note(s): This course is required to complete the Tier II credential requirements.

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EDUC 417B: Leadership Induction B (2 Credits)

As required by the California Credential Accreditation Commission, candidates for the administration services credential (ASC), in consultation with their advisor, assess their learning of competencies identified in EDUC 417A.

Note(s): This course is for Tier II administrative credential students.

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EDUC 418A: Administrative Field Experience (2 Credits)

This field-based course connects theory to practice through field-based research projects and advising. The course provides extended time for reflection on action and will build a candidate's administrative knowledge base and conceptual understanding.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 417A and EDUC 417B

Note(s): The is a Tier II Administrative Credential course open to public school administrators only.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 418B: Administrative Field Experience (2 Credits)

This field-based course connects theory to practice through field-based research projects and advising. The course provides extended time for reflection on action and will build a candidate's administrative knowledge base and conceptual understanding. This course is the second in a two-part series and is required for the completion of the ASC Tier II.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 417A and EDUC 417B and EDUC 418A

Note(s): This is a Tier II Adminsitrative Credential course open to public school administrators only.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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EDUC 420: Education Research Colloquium (2 Credits)

This colloquium is designed to introduce doctoral students to the breadth of possibilities for research topics in education, the variety of ways to frame research questions, and the diverse methods of answering research questions. The texts for this course will draw on scholarly work from faculty in the Mills School of Education. Students will understand not only the particular interests of Mills faculty, but begin to identify faculty with scholarly interests similar to their own that inspire their thinking and who may work with them on their dissertation committee.

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EDUC 421A: Inquiry into Leadership: Practice into Theory I (4 Credits)

Introduces students to the theory and practice of action research, with a special focus on issues of leadership in education. Emphasis on designing and implementing an action research project related to one's practice.

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EDUC 421B: Inquiry into Leadership: Practice into Theory II (4 Credits)

This course utilizes Participatory Action Research (PAR) as a guiding methodological framework to understand problems of ed leadership. PAR emphasizes the importance of respecting the situated knowledge of local informants. PAR methodology stresses the significance of working with community informants and working toward social change. This course continues the exploration of theoretical and practical issues in action research by carrying out proposed individual and group PAR projects. Emphasis on the analysis of data and drawing conclusions leading to action for change.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 421A

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EDUC 422: Current Policy Issues in Early Childhood (2 Credits)

An overview of current research on disciplines and domains that influence early childhood, including neuroscience, pedagogical perspectives, family support systems, family mental health, and cognitive development of young children. Includes social policy issues related to young children, and focuses on the importance of linking public policy development with research and best practices. Governmental structures at a federal and state level that impact child -family policies are reviewed.

Note(s): This class is only open to students enrolled in the Leadership Program in Early childhood

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EDUC 423: Educational Leadership and Public Policy (2 Credits)

Legislation and public policy determine the fiscal, programmatic, and operational purview of childhood programs. Increasingly, educational administrators and other leaders must exercise political skills to influence policy supportive of their aims. This course explores the interdependence of educational and other disciplines that impact young children and their families through legislation and regulatory decisions, and examines the role of leader-practitioners in influencing policy and regulatory development on local as well as state and national levels.

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EDUC 424: Educational Program Evaluation (4 Credits)

Students will study efforts of school systems to establish systems of accountability. In doing so, they will encounter and learn the uses and limitations of evaluation as an instrument of policy and for improving educational programs, as well as develop skills and awareness of the important role well-designed evaluation systems play in the operation of an effective educational institution.

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EDUC 425: Introduction to Research Design (4 Credits)

The course explores the challenges facing those working to design, implement, and evaluate educational policies and programs. Students will deepen their sense of the practical challenges of the policy process and their sense of the roles scholars have and can play in relation to these issues. Attention will also be paid to oral presentations of ideas and facilitation of classroom discussion.

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EDUC 426: Ethical and Moral Considerations in Educational Leadership (4 Credits)

This course is organized around the concept of education as a moral enterprise and of the role of educational leadership in modern society, and provides students with opportunities to examine their own values, beliefs, and attitudes in relationship to their leadership responsibilities and practice. Emphasis is given to the exercise of leadership in the service of the school community. Presents various ethical frameworks and perspectives on ethics, including the importance of ethical principles in decision making.

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EDUC 427: Issues of Race and Ethnicity in Education (4 Credits)

This course will explore the social, cultural, economic, pedagogical, and psychological experiences of race and ethnicity in schools and classrooms. We will focus on developing a deeper understanding of the ways race and ethnicity shape students' educational experiences; investigating why even well-meaning educational reforms often fail to adequately address racial and ethnic inequity in education; and exploring effective efforts to better address the needs of students of color and their families.

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EDUC 432: Curricular Leadership (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the role of educational administrators as curriculum leaders. Emphasis is given to the concept of schools as communities of learners and to the use of inquiry as a basis for curriculum planning and development.

Note(s): Must be in Educational Leadership Program.

EDUC 434: Research Methods: Proposal Design and Development I (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the elements of a research/dissertation proposal. The course examines the importance of varied aspects of proposal design, including development of a research question and problem statement; identification and review of relevant literatures; formulation of conceptual frameworks; description and justification of research methods; and consideration of ethical research practices. Students will study these issues as they relate to proposal design in general and in relation to their specific research interests.

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EDUC 435: Research Methods: Proposal Design and Development II (4 Credits)

Focuses on refinement of research questions and conceptual frameworks, the use of literature to contextualize research questions, and advanced instruction on research methods. Supports students as they complete the doctoral qualifying exam, defend a dissertation research proposal, and gain approval for research from the Mills College Human Subjects Review Committee.

Prerequisite(s): EDUC 434

EDUC 438: California Community College History, Politics and Policy (4 Credits)

California community colleges operate in between K-12 schools and state run universities: they have more autonomy than K-12 schools, but less autonomy than universities. Understanding the specific history, mission, and politics of the community college system in California will allow leaders to be more effective in their work with partners in federal, state and local government, CSU and UC systems, as well as with independent colleges.

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EDUC 440: Hip Hop Pedagogy (4 Credits)

The course will draw connections between popular culture and "liberal learning," examining how hip-hop is related to the community while illustrating the principles of liberatory pedagogy. The course will examine theoretical and applied work that emphasizes education, hip-hop, and social capital.

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EDUC 441A: Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Waldorf Education (3 Credits)

This course explores Waldorf education and is designed for public school teachers. Waldorf education is developmentally appropriate, experiential, and academically rigorous. This course also integrates the Waldorf approach to serving traumatized children and youth.

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EDUC 442A: Project Based Learning in Waldorf Education (2 Credits)

In this course students will apply Waldorf theory through creating units of study for students. The units of study produced will include classroom activities and assignments that will reflect an understanding of Waldorf education.

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EDUC 446: Working with Families and the Community (2 Credits)

This course will prepare educators to be culturally responsive professionals. Students will explore what a community is, how it functions, its role in education, and how to develop strategies for building community within institutions supporting the care, education, and development of youth. Students will develop practical communication skills that will enhance their ability to work with all members of the community toward the education of children and youth.

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EDUC 450: Dissertation Research (2-4 Credits)

The dissertation research course provides an opportunity for students who are working on their dissertations to receive ongoing support and guidance. Students are only eligible to enroll in this course once they have completed all their doctoral course work. Students must enroll in this course during the time they are working on their proposals and their dissertations. Students may take this course for up to six semesters.

Pass/No Pass Only

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EDUC 475: Field Experience in Early Childhood Settings (2-4 Credits)

Graduate students in early childhood special education work in early intervention and preschool placements under the supervision of school staff and a Mills supervisor. Graduate students in the Leadership in Early Childhood Education Program work in settings such as early care and education, family service centers, child mental health consultation agencies, child care resource and referral agencies, legislative offices, public benefit law firms, and charitable foundations, under the guidance of Mills faculty and site supervisors.

Note(s): Will be offered in the summer as well as fall and spring.

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EDUC 480: Special Topics in Education (4 Credits)

Exploration of themes and/or topics not offered as part of the regular curriculum. Course content to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

EDUC 483: Advanced Seminar (1 Credits)

EDUC 497: Directed Reading for Dissertation (4 Credits)

Students read extensively in their area of interest under the direction of a faculty member. This directed reading is a requirement for students in the doctoral program.

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EDUC 499: Dissertation in Progress (0 Credits)