Book Art (BOOK)

BOOK 027: Introduction to Book Art (4 Credits)

This course offers the beginning student an introduction to the techniques, structures, tools, materials, and processes used in creating artists' books. Students will explore a broad range of studio practice, including letterpress printing, hand and computer typography, simple book structures, and basic relief printmaking as they examine the relationship of verbal, visual, and structural content in books. Students will complete group and individual projects. Field trips, guest artists.

Note(s): Enrollment priority given to first-year and sophomore students, and junior transfers. No auditors. Limit 12 students. Open to undergraduates only.

Meets the following Core requirements: Create, Innovate & Experiment

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

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BOOK 033: Introduction to Printmaking (3 Credits)

This course will cover a wide variety of printmaking techniques and processes including woodcut, linoleum block, monoprinting, paper lithography, and etching. Students will learn how to translate their drawings and ideas for images into prints that can be made both on and off the press. We will explore mark-making and the development of visual content and composition for both books and two-dimensional works.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

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BOOK 113: Creating Books/Creating Art: Artists' Books as Social Practice (3 Credits)

What does it mean to make books as art? How does social practice influence the content and form of artists’ books? We will explore contemporary artists’ books through the dynamic of social practice, with a focus on the intersections of gender, race, ethnicity and internationality. Students will create artists’ books that reflect this study, and develop one or more exhibitions or performances that allow for public examination and critique.We will work extensively with artists' books from our library's Special Collections. Field trips, guest artists.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 15 students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Create, Innovate & Experiment

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

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BOOK 117: Visible Language (4 Credits)

This course explores the language of type and its relevance to students’ own written and visual creations. We will examine contemporary trends in visual poetics and legibility, and study the history of writing and type. We will learn about the avant garde period, and students will research the history of written language from their cultural backgrounds. In the studio students will learn both traditional letterpress printing and experimental and improvisational techniques as they produce works on paper. Workshops, guest artists, and field trips will be included.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Create, Innovate & Experiment

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

View Course Goals

BOOK 120: The Structure of Books (4 Credits)

This course begins with the construction of several traditional hardcover bindings before moving to more complex techniques such as multi-section exposed sewing and basic leather binding. Students will design their own variations on traditional techniques and materials. Students will also learn basic box construction and methods of surface decoration. Students will also learn how to design and create artists' books using techniques learned in class.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Create, Innovate & Experiment

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

View Course Goals

BOOK 121: Building the Contemporary Book (4 Credits)

Students will develop a strong working knowledge of the tools and materials used in contemporary bookbinding while learning how to integrate structure with content in the development of their own one-of-a-kind artists' books. We will move from simple non-adhesive structures through various hardcover bindings and on to innovative three-dimensional book forms. Students will use various binding methods and simple mark-making methods to explore the structure and content of artists' books.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Create, Innovate & Experiment

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

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BOOK 130: History of the Book (3 Credits)

This course provides a historical survey of the book, printing, and publishing primarily in the West. Students will examine major transitions (e.g., manuscript to printed book) and physical aspects (e.g., bookbinding, illustration processes). We will study the book as a technology and the impact of books on society. Digital media, the future of the book, old and new types of reading, and copyright will be examined. The course includes writing and printing demonstrations, guest lectures, and field trips. Seminar format incorporates extensive use of the library’s rare book collection.

Note(s): Pass/No Pass or audit by permission of instructor. Limit 15 students. Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives

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BOOK 133: Introduction to Printmaking (3 Credits)

This course will cover a wide variety of printmaking techniques and processes including woodcut, linoleum block, monoprinting, paper lithography, and etching. Students will learn how to translate their drawings and ideas for images into prints that can be made both on and off the press. We will explore mark-making and the development of visual content and composition for both books and two-dimensional works.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

View Course Goals

BOOK 140: The Movable Book: Ideas in Time and Space (4 Credits)

This course explores the artist's book as a time-based medium. What common issues does the book have in relation to other time-based media such as music, film, and performance, and how do they diverge? How can the physical structure of the book be used to draw the reader into a deeply focused viewing experience? Students will learn how to create movable paper mechanisms, how to approach the structured use of time in the book form, as well as how to incorporate three-dimensional book structures and simple image making techniques into their own content for artists’ books.

Note(s): This class is available for letter grade or pass-no pass only. No auditors. Limit 12 students. Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Create, Innovate & Experiment

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

View Course Goals

BOOK 180: Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Book Art (4 Credits)

Exploration of themes and topics outside of the regular curriculum. Topics will vary by the instructor. All courses will include creative projects, reading and discussion. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

Note(s): Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

BOOK 180A: Special Topics (0.25-1 Credits)

BOOK 180AS: Paris in public & private; Voicing innovation in the 1920s (3-4 Credits)

Paris in post-war 1920s was a vibrant center of experimentation. Writers, artists and musicians challenged notions of gender, sexuality and, for U.S. expatriates, American conceptions about race, through their lives and creative work. This hybrid seminar-studio class will combine hands-on work in the book art studios with reading, discussion and the completion of creative projects. We will use the important resources of Mills’ Special Collections as a lens into the Modernist movement in art, performance and the ‘new world’ of printing and publishing by women. Field trips, guest artists

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment

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BOOK 184: Books as Multiples: Publishing on the Letterpress (4 Credits)

What is the connection between content and its physical form? How does meaning shift when its form changes? What does it mean to publish a book? How are form and content linked in your own work? Students will produce books in editions (multiples) in the letterpress studio as well as digitally as we investigate the ways text, image, and print come together in traditional and contemporary books. We will examine the history of print technologies, look at the work of today’s independent publishers, and explore the future of the book. Field trips, guest artists, and workshops will be included.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students. Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Meets the following Core requirements: Create, Innovate & Experiment

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

View Course Goals

BOOK 213: Artists' Books: Concept, Content, Form (4 Credits)

What are some conceptual building blocks for artists' books? How do form and content interact in their creation? By what critical standards are they judged? To explore these questions students will create their own artists' books. We will read from literature, visual studies, and the history and practice of bookmaking, and curate small exhibitions to document concepts and working methods of contemporary book artists as an exploration of current professional practice.

Note(s): Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

View Course Goals

BOOK 217: Visible Language (4 Credits)

This course explores the language of type and its relevance to students’ own written and visual creations. We will examine contemporary trends in visual poetics and legibility, and study the history of writing and type. We will learn about the avant garde period, and students will research the history of written language from their cultural backgrounds. In the studio students will learn both traditional letterpress printing and experimental and improvisational techniques as they produce works on paper. Workshops, guest artists, and field trips will be included.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students. Open to graduate students only.

View Course Goals

BOOK 220: The Structure of Books (4 Credits)

This course begins with the construction of several traditional hardcover bindings before moving to more complex techniques such as multi-section exposed sewing and basic leather binding. Students will design their own variations on traditional techniques and materials. Students will also learn basic box construction and methods of surface decoration. Students will also learn how to design and create artists' books using techniques learned in class.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students.

View Course Goals

BOOK 221: Building the Contemporary Book (4 Credits)

Students will develop a strong working knowledge of the tools and materials used in contemporary bookbinding while learning how to integrate structure with content in the development of their own one-of-a-kind artists' books. We will move from simple non-adhesive structures through various hardcover bindings and on to innovative three-dimensional book forms. Students will use various binding methods and simple mark-making methods to explore the structure and content of artists' books.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students.

View Course Goals

BOOK 230: Artists' Books: Conceptual Approaches (4 Credits)

This course explores the broad range of historical, conceptual and theoretical approaches that encompass the medium of the artist's book. Through readings, close examination of historical and contemporary examples, and hands-on creative projects, we will consider the artists' book as a form and locate it within the broader context of contemporary writing and visual art.

Note(s): Open to graduate students only.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

View Course Goals

BOOK 233: Introduction to Printmaking (4 Credits)

This course will cover a wide variety of printmaking techniques and processes including woodcut, linoleum block, monoprinting, paper lithography, and etching. Students will learn how to translate their drawings and ideas for images into prints that can be made both on and off the press. We will explore mark-making and the development of visual content and composition for both books and two-dimensional works.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students.

BOOK 236: Work in Context: Writing, Book Art, and Public Presentation (4 Credits)

This class will examine the intersection of text, form and visual art in contemporary art and creative writing practice. In addition to exploring the critical literature, students will consider the role of the curator in exhibitions and publishing through a series of visual and written projects and public presentations.

Prerequisite(s): BOOK 230

Note(s): This seminar is open to students in the MFA in Book Art and Creative Writing. Graduate students not in this degree program should apply to the instructor and the program chair. No auditors. Open to graduate students only.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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BOOK 240: The Movable Book: Ideas in Time and Space (4 Credits)

This course explores the artist's book as a time-based medium. What common issues does the book have in relation to other time-based media such as music, film, and performance, and how do they diverge? How can the physical structure of the book be used to draw the reader into a deeply focused viewing experience? Students will learn how to create movable paper mechanisms, how to approach the structured use of time in the book form, as well as how to incorporate three-dimensional book structures and simple image making techniques into their own content for artists’ books.

Note(s): This class is available for letter grade or pass-no pass only. No auditors. Limit 12 students. Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

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BOOK 250: Thesis for the MFA Degree (4 Credits)

Thesis supervision by two-member faculty committee (Book Art and Creative Writing).

Note(s): Book 250 is reserved for graduate students pursuing the MFA in Book Art & Creative Writing. No auditors. Open to graduate students only.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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BOOK 260: The Material Book (4 Credits)

The book is one of the most successful technologies in history, and one of the most invisible. We never ask ourselves how to operate a book, yet a book is one of the most iconic forms in our daily lives. We will investigate the nature of the book as an object through readings, close examinations of both rare and quotidian books housed in Special Collections, and through some hands-on work. We will look at the linkage between the architecture of the book and reading and writing practice, and we will explore contemporary artists’ books, independent publishing, zines and future possibilities.

Note(s): Open to graduate students only.

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BOOK 261: Seminar in Professional Practice (1 Credits)

This seminar will prepare students for their professional practice in book art. Topics to be explored include issues concerning the design and production of professional-level work, preparation of a professional portfolio and CV, teaching practicum, approaches to involvement in the book art professional community, and various aspects of running a professional book art studio practice. Students will have the option of doing internships, creative projects (fall only), and prep work for conference presentations and exhibitions.

Note(s): Letter Grade only. No auditors Limit 12 students. Open to graduate students only.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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BOOK 270: Book Art Concentration (2 Credits)

In their third semester students will identify a studio concentration in letterpress, bookbinding or artist’s books. Students in each concentration area will meet together with faculty throughout the semester to support the development of their thesis projects.

Prerequisite(s): BOOK 217 and BOOK 220

Note(s): This course is only open to MFA in Book Art students during the Fall of their second year. Limit 12 students. Open to graduate students only.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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BOOK 275: Bay Area Partnerships (4 Credits)

Students will work with a faculty mentor to identify a Bay Area institution where they will complete a creative or scholarly internship. Students will propose a plan of activities and responsibilities, will complete a contract and will make a final presentation.

Prerequisite(s): BOOK 217 and BOOK 220

Note(s): This course is only open to MFA in Book Art students. Limit 12 students. Open to graduate students only.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

View Course Goals

BOOK 280AS: Paris in public & private; Voicing innovation in the 1920s (3-4 Credits)

Paris in post-war 1920s was a vibrant center of experimentation. Writers, artists and musicians challenged notions of gender, sexuality and, for U.S. expatriates, American conceptions about race, through their lives and creative work. This hybrid seminar-studio class will combine hands-on work in the book art studios with reading, discussion and the completion of creative projects. We will use the important resources of Mills’ Special Collections as a lens into the Modernist movement in art, performance and the ‘new world’ of printing and publishing by women. Field trips, guest artists

BOOK 284: Books as Multiples: Publishing on the Letterpress (4 Credits)

What is the connection between content and its physical form? How does meaning shift when its form changes? What does it mean to publish a book? How are form and content linked in your own work? Students will produce books in editions (multiples) in the letterpress studio as well as digitally as we investigate the ways text, image, and print come together in traditional and contemporary books. We will examine the history of print technologies, look at the work of today’s independent publishers, and explore the future of the book. Field trips, guest artists, and workshops will be included.

Note(s): No auditors Limit 12 students. Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

View Course Goals