Art History (ARTH)

ARTH 018: Introduction to Western Art I (3 Credits)

This survey course explores major developments in the history of western art from prehistory through the early Renaissance. We will focus particular attention on questions of continuity and change in visual culture, asking how and why western artists innovated upon, borrowed from, transformed, or rejected the visual tradition of their predecessors and contemporaries.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 019: Introduction to Western Art II (3 Credits)

This survey course introduces students to the history of western art from the Renaissance through the twentieth century. We will explore the style, function, and meaning of western art in context, examine the development of new genres and techniques, and discuss art theory and criticism.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 034: Museum Studies Workshop (3 Credits)

This course will engage students in questions about the role of art museums as well as conceptual and logistical aspects of curatorial practices. In addition to weekly readings and written assignments, students will be expected to attend exhibitions and lectures in the San Francisco Bay Area. The final project will be a group-curated exhibition with an accompanying student researched and written exhibition catalogue.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 019

Note(s): Students should have previous exposure to modern or contemporary art.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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ARTH 040: AFRICAN AMER WOMEN ARTISTS (0.25-1.25 Credits)

ARTH 046: IP:AFRICAN AMERICAN ART (0.25-1.25 Credits)

ARTH 081: Introduction to Asian Art: India, Nepal, and Tibet (3 Credits)

Early Indian art celebrates Buddhism and Hinduism. The Buddhist stupas at Sanchi and the cave temples at Ajanta are studied, and the complex Buddhist theology that comprises the Nepalese and Tibetan Buddhist world culminates in the making of mandalas. The development of temple architecture and sculpture made for the Hindu gods at Elephanta, Ellora, and Mamallapuram, and the mediaeval temples at Khajurao and Orissa are studied. Hindu theology and the development of Buddhism and Jainism is studied in order to understand the meaning and purpose of early Indian art.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ARTH 082: Introduction to Asian Art: China (3 Credits)

Recent archaeological excavations in China are providing new evidence for reinterpreting the past. In this course we study ancient bronze vessels and jades unearthed from Shang and Zhou tombs, and ceramic armies from the Qin and Han periods. Buddhist art and the role of priests and merchants who travelled the Silk Road, and Calligraphy and scroll paintings from the Six Dynasties to the Sung and Yuan periods are studied. The teachings of Confucian and Taoist philosophy are studied in order to understand how these belief systems inform the cultural and aesthetic values of China.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ARTH 121: The Italian Renaissance (4 Credits)

This course selectively examines the visual culture of the Italian Renaissance in central Italy, focusing on major developments in Italian painting, sculpture, and architecture between 1400 and the 1580s in Florence and Rome. We will take a genre-based approach, closely linking the form of objects with their function and meaning within contemporary Italian society. Artists discussed include Masaccio, Sandro Botticelli, Donatello, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Parmigianino, Jacopo Pontormo, Agnolo Bronzino, Benvenuto Cellini, Giambologna, Giulio Romano, and many others.

Note(s): First Year students may enroll with approval of instructor and academic advisor.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 122: Art in Venice between East and West (4 Credits)

The Republic of Venice was a cultural crossroads between east and west. This course introduces students to the splendor of Venetian visual culture between the ninth and the seventeenth centuries, emphasizing the ways in which the Republic drew from both eastern and western artistic traditions to craft and reinforce an image of itself as a miraculous, eternal, and devout city. Key artists include the Bellini, Carpaccio, Titian, Tintoretto, and Veronese. Assignments will encourage students to develop their own visual, critical, rhetorical, interpretive, and creative skills.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 123: Northern European Art (4 Credits)

This course examines the art of northern Europe from about 1350 to 1580, focusing on painting and print-making in Germany and the Low Countries. We will explore developments in artistic technologies (oil painting, new print-making techniques, the development of paper) and discuss key themes raised in the scholarship of northern art, such as art and religious reform; illusionism; and the representation of women.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 124: Baroque Art in Europe (4 Credits)

Despite war and religious upheaval, the seventeenth century in Europe was a period of remarkable cultural flourishing and new artistic opportunities. Focusing on painting in Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands, this course examines European visual culture in the age of Caravaggio, Artemisia Gentileschi, Rembrandt van Rijn, Johannes Vermeer, Diego Velazquez, and Peter Paul Rubens. Themes will include the changing status of the artist, creative opportunities for women, theories of artistic achievement in the 17th century, and the development of new genres like landscape and still life.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 125: The Art of Coexistence: Jewish, Islamic, and Christian Art in Medieval Spain (0.25-1.25 Credits)

This course explores the visual culture of medieval Spain, from the age of Muslim rule through the Christian re-conquest of the Iberian peninsula. We will study painting, illuminated manuscripts, architecture, and sculpture produced by Sephardic Jews, Muslims, and Spanish Christians. A major theme of the course is the use of the visual arts to define self versus “other” in a diverse society; as we move from an age of tolerance to one of tumult and forcible expulsion, how did the peoples of medieval Spain use art to shape their identities, to delimit communities, and to define one another?

Meets the following Core requirements: International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ARTH 134: Museum Studies Workshop (4 Credits)

This course will engage students in questions about the role of art museums as well as conceptual and logistical aspects of curatorial practices. In addition to weekly readings and written assignments, students will be expected to attend exhibitions and lectures in the San Francisco Bay Area. The final project will be a group-curated exhibition with an accompanying student researched and written exhibition catalogue.

Prerequisite(s): ARTH 019

Note(s): Students should have previous exposure to modern or contemporary art.

Instructor Consent Required: Y

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ARTH 137: Art of the 20th Century (4 Credits)

The course explores primarily European and American art beginning in pre-war Paris, Moscow, Munich, Milan, Vienna, London, and New York. Internationally, artists were intrigued with the possibilities of abstraction. World Wars I and II, the Mexican and Russian Revolutions, the Weimar Republic, the American Depression, and the rise of European Fascism were contexts of further artistic movements. The course ends with late 20th-century art in various media and geographical locations.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 138: Contemporary Art (4 Credits)

In the context of the Cold War, the McCarthy period, and the explosive ’60s, American art and the American art market were dominant internationally. Over the next decades, however, a far more global picture of art making has evolved, partly through the expansion of international exhibitions in different parts of the world, in Asia, Africa, and South America, for example. This course will examine selected chapters of this complex history of contemporary art (post-WW II to the present), alternating between "the local" and "the global".

Meets the following Core requirements: International Perspectives, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

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ARTH 139K: History of Performance Art (0.25-1.25 Credits)

ARTH 171: AMERICAN BUILT ENVIRONMENT (0.25-1.25 Credits)

ARTH 176: HIST EUROPEAN PRINTMAKING (0.25-1.25 Credits)

ARTH 179: DIRECTED RESEARCH (0.25-1.25 Credits)

ARTH 180: Special Topics in Art History (4 Credits)

Exploration of themes and/or topics not offered as part of the regular curriculum. Course content to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

ARTH 180A: Visual Arts of the United States, 1830-1945 (3 Credits)

This course explores art in the U.S. in a period of rapid modernization. We consider how artists engaged the forces and anxieties of nation-building, westward expansion, Native-Euro contact, war, urbanization, industrialization, new class structures, mass communication, and consumer culture. The status of women, minorities, and immigrants as citizens and artists are a major focus. Taking a broad view of visual culture (murals, easel painting, sculpture, monuments, parks, architecture, urbanism, prints, photography), we examine artists’ efforts to define “American” art and culture.

Meets the following Core requirements: Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Women and Gender

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ARTH 180B: Art in Latin America and the Caribbean (3 Credits)

This course examines the art of ancient, colonial, and modern Latin American and the Caribbean. We address early contact between Europeans and indigenous cultures in Central and South America and the Caribbean; analyze how images served as powerful catalysts reflecting and constructing ideas of politics, religion, race, and gender; explore the independence era of the 19th century and the growing internationalism of the 20th; and consider the regionally specific developments of modernismo and the avant-garde. Field trips include SF MOMA, the de Young Museum, and Diego Rivera’s murals.

Meets the following Core requirements: Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives

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ARTH 181: The Art of Mughal India (4 Credits)

The Sultanate and Mughal rulers of India brought miniature painting and brilliant manuscript illustrations from Persia to India and introduced a new visual aesthetic. In this course Imperial albums compiled for the Mughal emperors will be studied together with Rajput paintings of the Hindu maharajas. The Red Forts of Delhi and Agra, the deserted city of Fatehpur Sikri, and the illumined Taj Mahal will also be studied. The tenets of Islam will be considered in order to understand the significance and meaning of Moslem art in India.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ARTH 183: Advanced Seminar in Art History (4 Credits)

In-depth examination of and critical inquiry into a specific subject through shared readings, discussion, and written assignments. Course content to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ.

ARTH 185: Painting of China (4 Credits)

The painting of China from the Han to the Qing dynasty is studied and concludes with discussions of painting during the Cultural Revolution and contemporary works that are being produced in the People's Republic of China today. Critical texts on calligraphy, painting styles and forms, together with writings on theory and methodology, will be read.

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 186: Japanese Painting and Prints (4 Credits)

The Tale of Genji and Heian court paintings, writing, and poetry are studied as they reveal the persistence of tradition and the development of an aesthetic that prevails in Japan’s visual arts. Ukiyo-e, woodblock prints of the Floating World, that reflected the popular tastes of Edo’s merchants, and stood in stark contrast to the refined tastes of the court, are studied in depth, together with contemporary literary works such as the samurai drama, Chushingura. Pureland Buddhism and Shinto are studied in order to understand the spiritual significance of Japanese aesthetic expression.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 188: Early Japanese Art (4 Credits)

Shinto art and architecture is studied with a focus on the shrines at Ise and Izumo. In contrast early Chinese style Buddhist temples of Nara and Kyoto, and later Shingon temples of the Heian period are studied. The introduction from China of Ch’an Buddhism, known as Zen Buddhism in Japan, had a profound effect upon the aesthetic tastes of the court, and especially on ink paintings, raku ceramics, gardens, and the highly ritualized Cha-no-yu, tea ceremony. Shinto and Zen Buddhism are studied in order to understand the spiritual foundations of Japanese aesthetic expression.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 190: Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Art (4 Credits)

This seminar explores two interrelated topics: how women artists revolutionized a male-dominated art world in the past 50 years, and how gender and sexuality became central themes of contemporary art. Starting with the late 1960s, we will study: feminism’s intersections with conceptual art, minimalism, postmodernism, and social practice art; the constant renovation of painting, sculpture, and photography through feminist and queer perspectives; and the profound cultural effects of the reimagining of gender, sexuality, and identity in contemporary art and art scholarship.

Note(s): First year students may enroll with the instructor's consent.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts

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ARTH 191: Seminar: Contemporary Art of Asia (4 Credits)

Asia has experienced severe ruptures with the past, and cultural values formed over millennia have been discarded. China replaced its dynastic tradition with Communism; Japan emerged from a feudal period of isolation to become a leading economic power; India and Indonesia cast off colonial ties and declared their independence. The focus of this seminar will be on the work of artists as critical observers of contemporary Asian society.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Create, Innovate & Experiment, International Perspectives, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives, Multicultural Perspectives

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ARTH 192: Seminar: Gender and the Western Visual Tradition (4 Credits)

This seminar explores how ideas about gender and gender roles influenced the form and production of Western art. We will interrogate connections between representation and notions of masculinity/femininity, motherhood, beauty, and sin; and reconsider women artists’ oeuvres in light of gender theory and feminism. Case studies will explore how our chosen methodology may radically alter our understanding of a work of art and the culture that produced it. While the course focuses on medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque art, students' individual projects may be drawn from a wider time period.

Note(s): First year students may enroll only with permission of the instructor.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Creation and Criticism in the Arts, Historical Perspectives, Women and Gender

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ARTH 193: Seminar: The Image and the Law (4 Credits)

This is a seminar intended to develop students' critical thinking, writing, and research skills through the close examination of case studies of art and the law. We will consider both domestic and international issues that impact the visual arts, such as freedom of expression, copyright and intellectual property, public funding for the arts, and cultural heritage.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 199: Critical and Theoretical Approaches to the History of Art (4 Credits)

This seminar explores the historical development of art history, criticism, and theory by studying selected examples of scholarly writings on the history of art. We will examine various approaches including formalist, iconographic, social, feminist, queer, and Marxist interventions in the history of art. This course serves as the capstone course in the art history major, but is also open to other students who wish to study a variety of interpretive and critical approaches to art and interpretation.

Note(s): Required for senior art history majors; open to juniors and seniors from other disciplines with the consent of the instructor.

Meets the following Core requirements: Critical Analysis, Race, Gender & Power, Written and Oral Communication II

Meets the following Gen Ed requirements: Historical Perspectives

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ARTH 239K: History of Performance Art (0.25-1.25 Credits)

ARTH 286: Japanese Painting and Prints (4 Credits)

This course traces the persistence of tradition and the development of an aesthetic that prevails in Japan's visual arts. Heian court paintings that include the Tale of Genji, which were to influence Japanese aesthetics to the present day, will be studied. Ukiyo-e, woodblock prints of Floating World that reflect the popular tastes of Edo's merchants, will also be studied.

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ARTH 293: Seminar: The Image and the Law (4 Credits)

This is a seminar intended to develop students' critical thinking, writing, and research skills through the close examination of case studies of art and the law. We will consider both domestic and international issues that impact the visual arts, such as freedom of expression, copyright and intellectual property, public funding for the arts, and cultural heritage.

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ARTH 296: INDEPENDENT STUDY (0.25-1 Credits)